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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2011, Article ID 968753, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/968753
Research Article

Subliminal Cues While Teaching: HCI Technique for Enhanced Learning

Département d'Informatique et de Recherche Opérationnelle, Université de Montréal, Office 2194, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 1J4

Received 2 June 2010; Accepted 25 September 2010

Academic Editor: Kenneth Revett

Copyright © 2011 Pierre Chalfoun and Claude Frasson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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