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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012, Article ID 324694, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/324694
Research Article

Does Humanity Matter? Analyzing the Importance of Social Cues and Perceived Agency of a Computer System for the Emergence of Social Reactions during Human-Computer Interaction

1Department of Social Psychology: Media and Communication, University of Duisburg-Essen, Forsthausweg 2, 47057 Duisburg, Germany
2Institute for Creative Technologies, University of Southern California, 12015 Waterfront Drive Playa Vista, Los Angeles, CA 90094-2536, USA

Received 31 March 2012; Revised 6 June 2012; Accepted 12 June 2012

Academic Editor: Kiyoshi Kiyokawa

Copyright © 2012 Jana Appel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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