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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2015, Article ID 271231, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/271231
Research Article

WozARd: A Wizard of Oz Method for Wearable Augmented Reality Interaction—A Pilot Study

1Sony Mobile Communications, Nya Vattentornet, 221 88 Lund, Sweden
2Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 221 00 Lund, Sweden

Received 28 November 2014; Revised 22 April 2015; Accepted 26 May 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Bellotti

Copyright © 2015 Günter Alce et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Head-mounted displays and other wearable devices open up for innovative types of interaction for wearable augmented reality (AR). However, to design and evaluate these new types of AR user interfaces, it is essential to quickly simulate undeveloped components of the system and collect feedback from potential users early in the design process. One way of doing this is the wizard of Oz (WOZ) method. The basic idea behind WOZ is to create the illusion of a working system by having a human operator, performing some or all of the system’s functions. WozARd is a WOZ method developed for wearable AR interaction. The presented pilot study was an initial investigation of the capability of the WozARd method to simulate an AR city tour. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 21 participants performing a simulated AR city tour. The data analysis focused on seven categories that can have an impact on how the WozARd method is perceived by participants: precision, relevance, responsiveness, technical stability, visual fidelity, general user-experience, and human-operator performance. Overall, the results indicate that the participants perceived the simulated AR city tour as a relatively realistic experience despite a certain degree of technical instability and human-operator mistakes.