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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2016, Article ID 2937632, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2937632
Research Article

Evaluating the Authenticity of Virtual Environments: Comparison of Three Devices

1University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland
2Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland

Received 30 November 2015; Revised 3 February 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Mariano Alcañiz

Copyright © 2016 Aila Kronqvist et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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