Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
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Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision126 days
Acceptance to publication21 days
CiteScore5.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.880
Impact Factor2.8

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Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research is now an open access journal, and your articles will be immediately available to read and reuse upon publication.

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 Journal profile

Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research provides a forum for the exchange of information about new and significant research in viticulture, oenology and related fields, and aims to promote these disciplines throughout the world.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Dr Stefano Poni is Professor of Viticulture at the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences at Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza. His research focuses on applied vine physiology and sustainable vineyard management in response to climate change.

 Special Issues

Do you think there is an emerging area of research that really needs to be highlighted? Or an existing research area that has been overlooked or would benefit from deeper investigation? Raise the profile of a research area by leading a Special Issue.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

The Influence of Prefermentation Skin Contact, Stabulation, and Skin Fermentation on the Aromatic Behaviour and Phenolic Compounds of Important Austrian White Wine Cultivars

Many varietal aromas of wine are located in the berry skin. In the present study, we evaluated four important Austrian grape varieties: Grüner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, Traminer, and Pinot Blanc. We assessed whether prefermentation skin contact, fermentation with the skin (only for Grüner Veltliner), and stabulation (lees stirring; only for Sauvignon Blanc, Traminer, and Pinot Blanc) could enhance the varietal aromas of the different grape cultivars. The aim was to intensify the varietal aromas without extracting the undesirable phenols. We performed a detailed analytical characterisation of approximately 100 volatile and phenolic compounds as well as a sensory characterisation. Although mash fermentation significantly increased the spicy aromas of Grüner Veltliner, which are affected by climate change (especially the sesquiterpene rotundone), it markedly decreased the fruitiness and increased the bitterness; therefore, it cannot be recommended for this cultivar. For Sauvignon Blanc, stabulation is a possible option; the varietal aromas (thiols and methoxypyrazines) were increased in the final wines of these variants. For Pinot Blanc and Traminer, prefermentation skin contact yielded the best results: for Traminer, it produced the highest content of monoterpenes (especially z-rose oxide), and for Pinot Blanc, it produced the highest content of ethyl esters. To summarise, stabulation will not completely replace classic skin contact, and mash fermentation is certainly not an alternative for the production of standard Grüner Veltliner wine. However, additional investigations are necessary with regard to other grape varieties, terroirs, and vintages before we can make final recommendations.

Review Article

Rootstocks for Grapevines Now and into the Future: Selection of Rootstocks Based on Drought Tolerance, Soil Nutrient Availability, and Soil pH

Rootstocks are used in viticulture to manage plant pests and diseases, particularly phylloxera and root-knot nematodes, and to improve grape and wine production. A wide range of rootstocks are commercially available, making selecting the optimal rootstock a difficult decision. In particular, distinct rootstock genotypes may manifest varying degrees of tolerance or resistance to abiotic stress, necessitating meticulous consideration during the rootstock selection process. This article reviews characteristics of various commercial rootstocks, as well as rootstocks being developed in recent years. This review further discusses responses of rootstocks to drought, soil nutrients, and soil pH. This review mainly focuses on influence of rootstocks on physiology characteristics of grafted scions rather than berry yield and quality. The breadth of this review benefits both researchers and practitioners by providing comprehensive summery of rootstocks to inform selection and to guide future research.

Research Article

Minerality in Wine: Textual Analysis of Chablis Premier Cru Tasting Notes

The term minerality is often used to describe high-quality still white wines produced in cooler regions, such as Chablis. What minerality means in sensory terms and what is responsible for its presence is the subject of debate, however. This study explored the concept of minerality by analysing 16,542 Chablis Premier Cru tasting notes entered into CellarTracker between 2003 and 2022 on wines three to seven years old, together with weather, topography, and soil data for the Chablis area. The top three words used to describe Chablis Premier Cru wine were citrus, minerality, and acidity. Mentions of minerality declined between 1999 and 2019 vintages, whereas those of acidity, salinity, floral, orchard fruit, and stone fruit increased. The trends for minerality and salinity were slightly stronger with the year of tasting (2005 to 2022) than vintage. Bigram analysis indicated that consumers were more than 1.5 times as likely to refer to a stony kind of minerality as a saline one and only rarely smoky minerality. Use of the term minerality was correlated with growing season temperature and sunshine hours (negatively with each), as well as vineyard aspect (negatively with percentage vineyard area facing South or South-West), but not with Kimmeridgian soil type. The results imply that soils and geology are not a principal source of minerality in Chablis wine, but growing season warmth and sunshine are relevant to minerality. There is no simple explanation of minerality in Chablis wine; however, the recent decline in the use of this term for Chablis wine may be a consequence of three factors in combination: (i) it has become less fashionable; (ii) consumers are choosing “saline” instead of “mineral” when appropriate, but retaining it for “stony” sensations; and/or (iii) warming from climate change has reduced minerality.

Research Article

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Solar Water Heating Systems in the Winemaking Industry

The present work analyzes the feasibility of using solar water heating systems (SWHS) to supply the hot water required in the winemaking industries. The hot water demand of the sector was characterized by selecting patterns that encompass the wide range of existing casuistry. After determining the production potential of the SWHS by using an experimental system, 22500 energy simulations were carried out, combining different locations, energy prices, and prices of the necessary investment. The results demonstrate that the seasonality and irregularity of a winery’s demand pattern drastically condition the viability and profitability of SWHS. In wineries with high demand, which are relatively uniform throughout the year, the solar system with optimized design achieves energy consumption reductions between 32% (low radiation) and 52% (high radiation), with payback between 4.3 and 7.2 years. On the other hand, in wineries with highly seasonal consumption, SWHS are not profitable even in very favorable cases.

Research Article

Weather Variables for Within-Vineyard Awareness of Botrytis Risk

Background and Aims. Botrytis bunch rot (BBR) in cool temperate climates is a key constraint to the consistent supply of grapes to winery specifications. BBR severities have been correlated with specific environmental conditions; however, data-driven applications intended to support crop protection decisions are restricted in access and/or of unknown commercial value. The aims of this study were to evaluate variables providing within-vineyard awareness of BBR risk in Riesling vines. Methods and Results. Descriptors of BBR epidemics from eight site years, 2009–2014, were developed for vine areas of ∼0.5 ha within two regions of Tasmania with different climates. Two variables using the daily Bacchus index, from crop stage E-L 19 to E-L 31 or 34, accounted for >80% of the variance in the final mean BBR severity. A BBR risk index (BBR-I), incorporating the mean daily Bacchus index from E-L 19 to E-L 31 and the median daily vapour pressure deficit of air at 15 : 00 during the late-season interval, accounted for up to 99.5% of the variance in the final mean BBR severity. The late-season interval (days) or median daily RH (%) at 15:00 in the same period accounted for 86.4 or 83.3% of the variance. Spatial variability of BBR severity mapped in 4.8 ha of Sauvignon Blanc in 2018-19 confirmed the need to apply BBR risk indicators at an appropriate spatial scale. Conclusions. Environmental variables with biological relevance served as indicators of BBR risk at the study sites and have the potential to discriminate BBR risk among production regions in Tasmania. Significance of the Study. Study findings are expected to support the development of applications that raise awareness of BBR risk at an appropriate spatial scale for in-season adaption of crop protection, diagnosis of crop protection efficacy, and/or site selection decisions. Accompanying formulae with sample data in Microsoft® Excel will support transitions to automated data analyses.

Review Article

Impact of Cluster Thinning on Wine Grape Yield and Fruit Composition: A Review and Meta-Analysis

For wine grape producers, achieving an optimal balance between vegetative and reproductive growth is a key factor in producing high quality fruit and meeting production quotas. This balance is often measured as the leaf-area-to-yield ratio. To increase this ratio, producers often use “cluster thinning” (CT), a management practice involving a selective removal of grape clusters from vines. Despite this, no consensus has been established regarding the optimal CT timing and severity for consistently improving fruit composition. The objective of this work was to identify whether CT “timing” (bloom, pea-size, lag phase, and veraison) or “severity” (15–35%, 36–55%, and 56–75%) influences yield and fruit composition. To achieve this objective, a meta-analysis of 160 publications on CT in grape was reduced to 78 studies via 10 data curation steps. We reported the influence of CT timing and severity on yield and fruit composition, as well as their impact on the yield-fruit composition tradeoff. First, CT timing showed little influence on fruit composition, which provides producers with greater flexibility when using this practice. Second, CT severity was impactful on improving fruit composition (TSS and pH); only the moderate range (36–55%) was effective. In conclusion, wine grape composition is more influenced by CT severity than timing. This work has important implications for grape producers and their approach to improving grape composition.

Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Logo for Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision126 days
Acceptance to publication21 days
CiteScore5.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.880
Impact Factor2.8
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Article of the Year Award: Impactful research contributions of 2022, as selected by our Chief Editors. Discover the winning articles.