Advances in Meteorology
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Acceptance rate23%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication22 days
CiteScore3.900
Journal Citation Indicator0.420
Impact Factor2.223

Climatology Definition of the Myanmar Southwest Monsoon (MSwM): Change Point Index (CPI)

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Advances in Meteorology publishes research in all areas of meteorology and climatology. Topics include forecasting techniques and applications, meteorological modelling, data analysis, atmospheric chemistry and physics, and climate change.

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Dr Jamie Cleverly, the journal’s Chief Editor, is based at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia. Their research interests include carbon, water and energy fluxes of arid-land Acacia swales; physics of the atmospheric surface layer and interactions with terrestrial ecosystems.

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Research Article

Potential Impacts of Future Climate Changes on Crop Productivity of Cereals and Legumes in Tamil Nadu, India: A Mid-Century Time Slice Approach

Climate change is a terrible global concern and one of the greatest future threats to societal development as a whole. The accelerating pace of climate change is becoming a major challenge for agricultural production and food security everywhere. The present study uses the midcentury climate derived from the ensemble of 29 general circulation models (GCMs) on a spatial grid to quantify the anticipated climate change impacts on rice, maize, black gram, and red gram productivity over Tamil Nadu state in India under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. The future climate projections show an unequivocal increase of annual maximum temperature varying from 0.9 to 2.2°C for RCP 4.5 and 1.4 to 2.7°C in RCP 8.5 scenario by midcentury, centered around 2055 compared to baseline (1981–2020). The projected rise in minimum temperature ranges from 1.0 to 2.2°C with RCP 4.5 and 1.8 to 2.7°C under RCP 8.5 scenario. Among the monsoons, the southwest monsoon (SWM) is expected to be warmer than the northeast monsoon (NEM). Annual rainfall is predicted to increase up to 20% under RCP 4.5 scenario in two-third of the area over Tamil Nadu. Similarly, RCP 8.5 scenario indicates the possibility of an increase in rainfall in the midcentury with higher magnitude than RCP 4.5. Both SWM and NEM seasons are expected to receive higher rainfall during midcentury under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 than the baseline. In the midcentury, climate change is likely to pose a negative impact on the productivity of rice, maize, black gram, and red gram with both RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios in most places of Tamil Nadu. The magnitude of the decline in yield of all four crops would be more with RCP 8.5 over RCP 4.5 scenario in Tamil Nadu. Future climate projections made through multi-climate model ensemble could increase the plausibility of future climate change impact assessment on crop productivity. The adverse effects of climate change on cereal and legume crop productivity entail the potential adaptation options to ensure food security.

Research Article

Long-Term (2007 to 2018) Energy and CO2 Fluxes over an Agriculture Ecosystem in the Southeastern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau

Long-term eddy covariance flux observations over complex topography are crucial for improving the understanding of the turbulent exchanges between the land and atmosphere. Based on a 12-year (2007–2018) record dataset measured with the eddy covariance technique over the Dali agriculture ecosystem in the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, we investigated the diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations of the sensible heat flux (Hs), latent heat flux (LE), and carbon dioxide flux (Fc), and their controlling variables. The results showed that Hs and LE exhibited similar diurnal and seasonal variations, while the amplitude of LE was clearly larger than that of Hs throughout the year. The turbulent fluxes showed remarkable fluctuation on the annual scale. The annual average Hs (LE) increases (decreases) from approximately 8 (110) W·m−2 during 2007–2013 to 20 (79) W·m−2 during 2014–2018. The annual cumulative net CO2 ecosystem exchange (NEE) increases significantly from approximately −739 g·C·m−2·yr−1 during 2007–2013 to −218 g·C·m−2·yr−1 during 2014–2018. The relationship between turbulent fluxes and meteorological variables was also examined. Wind speed (WS) is found to be the dominant controlling factor for the Hs on different temporal scales and their correlation coefficients increase when the timescales vary from daily to annual scale; whereas the product of WS and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is the major meteorological variable controlling the LE over all temporal scales. The net radiation (Rn) is the dominating factor for Fc on daily and monthly timescales, while WS becomes the most controlling factor for Fc on an annual scale. Notably, surface energy and CO2 fluxes are also greatly influenced by the vegetation cover surrounding the measurement site.

Research Article

Influence of Underlying Surface on Distribution of Hourly Heavy Rainfall over the Middle Yangtze River Valley

The variation of boundary layer circulation caused by the influence of complex underlying surface is one of the reasons why it is difficult to forecast hourly heavy rainfall (HHR) in the middle Yangtze River Valley (YRV). Based on the statistics of high-resolution observation data, it is found that the low resolution data underestimate the frequency of HHR in the mountain that are between the twain-lake basins in the middle YRV (TLB-YRV). The HHR frequency of mountainous area in the TLB-YRV is much higher than that of Dongting Lake on its left and is equivalent to the HHR frequency of Poyang Lake on its right. The hourly reanalysis data of ERA5 were used to study the variation of boundary layer circulation when HHR occurred. It can be found that the boundary layer circulation corresponding to different underlying surfaces changed under the influence of the weather system. Firstly, the strengthening of the weather system in the early morning resulted in the strengthening of the southwest low-level air flow, which intensified the uplift of the windward slope air flow on the west and south slopes of the mountainous areas in the TLB-YRV. As a result, the sunrise HHR gradually increases from the foot of the mountain. The high-frequency HHR period of sunrise occurs when the supergeostrophic effect is weakened, the low-level vorticity and frontal forcing are strengthened, and the water vapor flux convergence begins to weaken. Secondly, the high-frequency HHR period of the sunset is caused by stronger local uplift and more unstable atmospheric stratification, but the enhanced local uplift is caused by the coupling of the terrain forcing of the underlying surface and the enhanced northern subgeostrophic flow, which causes the HHR to start closer to the mountain top at sunset than at sunrise.

Research Article

Seasonal Variability of Air Pollutants and Their Relationships to Meteorological Parameters in an Urban Environment

Air quality in urban areas is deteriorating over time with the increased pollutant distribution levels mainly caused due to anthropogenic activities. In addition, these pollutant distribution levels may relate to changing meteorological conditions. However, the relationships were not researched in-depth in the context of Sri Lanka, a country with a significant impact on climate change. The main objective of this study was to provide a broader perspective on the seasonal variation of tiny particles in air (PM2.5 and PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in two urban cities (Colombo and Kandy) in Sri Lanka over 3 years period (2018–2021) and the possible relationships between air pollution and meteorological variables. Results show that all the aforementioned pollutants except O3 consistently depict two peaks during the day, one in the morning (∼07:00–09:00 local time) and the other in the evening (∼18:00–20:00 local time). These peaks coincided with the traffic jams observed in both cities. The results further revealed that the concentration of all pollutants has significant seasonal variations. Compared to two monsoon seasons, the highest daily average PM2.5 (31.2 μg/m3), PM10 (49.5 μg/m3), NO2 (18.9 ppb), CO (717.5 ppb), O3 (18.5 ppb), and SO2 (9.4 ppb) concentrations in Colombo are recorded during northeast monsoon (NEM) seasons while contrast pattern is observed in Kandy. In addition, it was found that wind speed with its direction is the most influencing factor for the pollutant concentration except for SO2 and O3 in two cities, and this is irrespective of the season. This study’s findings contribute to understanding the seasonality of ambient air quality and the relationship between meteorological factors and air pollutants. These findings ultimately lead to designing and implementing season-specific control strategies to achieve air pollution reduction at a regional scale.

Research Article

The Relationship between the Atmospheric Heat Source over Tibetan Plateau and the Westerly-Monsoon Evolution in August and Its Physical Mechanism

In this study, the relationship between the East Asian subtropical westerly jet (EASWJ) and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) (westerly monsoon) and the correlation with the atmospheric heat source (AHS) on the Tibetan plateau (TP), especially the possible connection of the sudden enhancement of the correlation in August were analyzed. The results show that there is a significant correlation between the EASWJ and the EASM from June to October in terms of both intra-annual variability and interannual fluctuations, and the correlation between the AHS over TP and the EASWJ and the EASM during the same period is significantly enhanced in August. The synthetic analysis indicated that when the AHS was strong, a positive anomaly of a horizontal temperature gradient appeared over TP, which was conducive to the southward shift of the high-altitude temperature gradient center, resulting in the southward position of the axis of the 200 hPa westerly jet, and an upward and downward inclined westerly anomaly zone appeared from the south slope of TP to the main body and its north slope. Meanwhile, the East Asia–Pacific (EAP) teleconnection pattern with a negative phase appeared at 500 hPa, and TP to western Japan was located in the negative value area of the wave train. The AHS was conducive to the enhancement of the EAP negative phase, which was not conducive to the further northward transportation of water vapor by the EASM. On the contrary, when the AHS on TP was weak, the position of the westerly jet was northward and the EAP positive phase enhanced, contributing to the further northward transport of water vapor from the EASM.

Research Article

LiDAR-Based Windshear Detection via Statistical Features

Windshear is a kind of microscale meteorological phenomenon which can cause danger to the landing and takeoff of aircrafts. Accurate windshear detection plays a crucial role in aviation safety. With the development of machine learning, several learning-based methods are proposed for windshear detection, i.e., windshear and non-windshear classification. To obtain accurate detection results, it is significant to extract features that can distinguish windshear and non-windshear properly from the obtained wind velocity data. In this paper, we mainly introduce two statistical indicators derived from the Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) observational wind velocity data by plan position illustrate (PPI) scans for windshear features construction. Besides the indicators directly derived from the wind velocity data, we also study the visual information from the corresponding conical images of wind velocity. Based on the proposed indicators, we construct three feature vectors for windshear and non-windshear classification. Inspired by the idea of multiple instance learning, the wind velocity data collected in the 4 minutes within the reported time spot are considered in the procedure of feature vector construction, which can reduce the possibility of windshear features missing. Both statistical methods and clustering methods are applied to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed feature vectors. Numerical results show that the proposed feature vectors have good effect on windshear and non-windshear classification and can be used to provide more accurate windshear alerting to pilots in practice.

Advances in Meteorology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate23%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication22 days
CiteScore3.900
Journal Citation Indicator0.420
Impact Factor2.223
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.