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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2010, Article ID 301395, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/301395
Research Article

Ocean Emission Effects on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: Insights from Two Case Studies

1Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210011, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210081, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

Received 9 January 2010; Revised 28 February 2010; Accepted 24 April 2010

Academic Editor: Markus D. Petters

Copyright © 2010 Armin Sorooshian and Hanh T. Duong. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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