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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4513823, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4513823
Research Article

An MCV Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Model with Height-Based Terrain following Coordinate: Tests of Waves over Steep Mountains

1National Meteorological Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 10086, China
2Center of Numerical Weather Prediction, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 10086, China
3State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing 100086, China
4Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502, Japan
5School of Human Settlement and Civil Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049, China

Received 20 November 2015; Accepted 4 February 2016

Academic Editor: Xiao-Ming Hu

Copyright © 2016 Xingliang Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A nonhydrostatic atmospheric model was tested with the mountain waves over various bell-shaped mountains. The model is recently proposed by using the MCV (multimoment constrained finite volume) schemes with the height-based terrain following coordinate representing the topography. As discussed in our previous work, the model has some appealing features for atmospheric modeling and can be expected as a practical framework of the dynamic cores, which well balances the numerical accuracy and algorithmic complexity. The flows over the mountains of various half widths and heights were simulated with the model. The semianalytic solutions to the mountain waves through the linear theory are used to check the performance of the MCV model. It is revealed that the present model can accurately reproduce various mountain waves including those generated by the mountains with very steep inclination and is very promising for numerically simulating atmospheric flows over complex terrains.