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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1526209, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1526209
Research Article

Indoor/Outdoor Air Quality Assessment at School near the Steel Plant in Taranto (Italy)

1Biology Department, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari, Italy
2Apulia Region Environmental Protection Agency (ARPA Puglia), Corso Trieste 27, 70126 Bari, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to A. Di Gilio; ti.abinu@oiligid.aissela

Received 9 January 2017; Accepted 20 February 2017; Published 22 May 2017

Academic Editor: Pedro Salvador

Copyright © 2017 A. Di Gilio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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