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Anemia
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 617204, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/617204
Review Article

Beta-Thalassemia Major and Female Fertility: The Role of Iron and Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress

Hematology Unit & Endocrine Unit, 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Athens, “Sotiria” General Hospital, 152 Mesogeion Avenue, 11527 Athens, Greece

Received 29 June 2013; Revised 22 October 2013; Accepted 11 November 2013

Academic Editor: Fernando Ferreira Costa

Copyright © 2013 Paraskevi Roussou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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