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Anemia
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 479329, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/479329
Research Article

Magnitude of Anemia and Associated Factors among Pediatric HIV/AIDS Patients Attending Zewditu Memorial Hospital ART Clinic, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, P.O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia
2Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Science, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Received 17 November 2014; Revised 13 March 2015; Accepted 16 March 2015

Academic Editor: Duran Canatan

Copyright © 2015 Hylemariam Mihiretie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Anemia is one of the most commonly observed hematological abnormalities and an independent prognostic marker of HIV disease. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of anemia and associated factors among pediatric HIV/AIDS patients attending Zewditu Memorial Hospital (ZMH) ART Clinic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pediatric HIV/AIDS patients of Zewditu Memorial Hospital (ZMH) between August 05, 2013, and November 25, 2013. A total of 180 children were selected consecutively. Stool specimen was collected and processed. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics and associated risk factors. Data were entered into EpiData 3.1.1. and were analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. Results. The total prevalence of anemia was 22.2% where 21 (52.5%), 17 (42.5%), and 2 (5.0%) patients had mild, moderate, and severe anemia. There was a significant increase in severity and prevalence of anemia in those with CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/μL (). Having intestinal parasitic infections (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI, 1.1–7.2), having lower CD4+ T cell count (AOR = 3.8, 95% CI, 1.6–9.4), and being HAART naïve (AOR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.6–9.4) were identified as significant predictors of anemia. Conclusion. Anemia was more prevalent and severe in patients with low CD4+ T cell counts, patients infected with intestinal parasites/helminthes, and HAART naïve patients. Therefore, public health measures and regular follow-up are necessary to prevent anemia.