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Anemia
Volume 2015, Article ID 763576, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/763576
Research Article

Intravenous Iron Therapy in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia: Dosing Considerations

1Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Norristown, PA 19403, USA
2St. John’s University, Jamaica, NY 11439, USA
3Department of Pathology and Medicine (Hematology), Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Received 6 May 2015; Revised 18 June 2015; Accepted 23 June 2015

Academic Editor: Bruno Annibale

Copyright © 2015 Todd A. Koch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for iron therapy dosing in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), we conducted a study examining the benefits of a higher cumulative dose of intravenous (IV) iron than what is typically administered. Methods. We first individually analyzed 5 clinical studies, averaging the total iron deficit across all patients utilizing a modified Ganzoni formula; we then similarly analyzed 2 larger clinical studies. For the second of the larger studies (Study 7), we also compared the efficacy and retreatment requirements of a cumulative dose of 1500 mg ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) to 1000 mg iron sucrose (IS). Results. The average iron deficit was calculated to be 1531 mg for patients in Studies 1–5 and 1392 mg for patients in Studies 6-7. The percentage of patients who were retreated with IV iron between Days 56 and 90 was significantly () lower (5.6%) in the 1500 mg group, compared to the 1000 mg group (11.1%). Conclusions. Our data suggests that a total cumulative dose of 1000 mg of IV iron may be insufficient for iron repletion in a majority of patients with IDA and a dose of 1500 mg is closer to the actual iron deficit in these patients.