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Anemia
Volume 2015, Article ID 853835, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/853835
Research Article

Attitudes toward Management of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Complications: A National Survey of Academic Family Physicians

1Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100195, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
2Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100237, Gainesville, FL 32610-0237, USA
3Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, 22-28 Princess Road West, Leicester LE1 6TP, UK
4Department of Family and Community Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Science Center at El Paso, 9849 Kenworthy Street, El Paso, TX 79924, USA
5Division of Blood Disorders, CDC, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Mail-Stop E87, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

Received 11 September 2014; Accepted 2 February 2015

Academic Editor: Duran Canatan

Copyright © 2015 Arch G. Mainous III et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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