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Anemia
Volume 2017, Article ID 6935648, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6935648
Research Article

Low Hemoglobin among Pregnant Women in Midwives Practice of Primary Health Care, Jatinangor, Indonesia: Iron Deficiency Anemia or β-Thalassemia Trait?

1Program Study of Midwifery, Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran and Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia
4Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran and Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia

Correspondence should be addressed to Edhyana Sahiratmadja; di.ca.dapnu@ajdamtarihas.e

Received 1 February 2017; Revised 22 March 2017; Accepted 18 April 2017; Published 29 May 2017

Academic Editor: Duran Canatan

Copyright © 2017 Ari Indra Susanti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Low hemoglobin (Hb) or anemia is common among pregnant women in developing countries which may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes and maternal deaths. Our study aimed to assess Hb level measured by midwives in primary health care facility at rural area of Jatinangor, Indonesia, and to explore whether the anemia was due to iron deficiency (IDA) or β-thalassemia trait (β-TT). Pregnant women () had finger prick test for Hb level during a regular antenatal care examination from October to November 2016. Hb level by finger prick test was compared with venous blood, measured by complete blood count (CBC). Indices including MCV and MCH and indices of Shine & Lal, Mentzer, Srivastava, Engels & Frase, Ehsani, and Sirdah were analyzed to differentiate anemia due to IDA and anemia due to suspect β-TT. HbA2 was measured to confirm β-TT. Anemic pregnant women were found in 86.7% by finger prick test compared to 21.9% () by CBC. The prevalence of β-TT in our study was 5.7%. Hb measurement among pregnant women in low resource area is highly important; however, finger prick test in this study showed a high frequency of anemia which may lead to iron oversupplementation. A standard CBC is encouraged; MCV and MCH would help midwives to identify β-TT.