Advances in Orthopedics
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Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore1.630
Impact Factor-
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A Biomechanical Comparison of Two Techniques of Latarjet Procedure in Cadaveric Shoulders

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 Journal profile

Advances in Orthopedics provides a forum for orthopaedics working on improving the quality of orthopedic health care. Topics relate to arthroplasty, hand surgery, limb reconstruction, pediatric orthopaedics, sports medicine etc.

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Advances in Orthopedics maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Minimally Invasive Carpal Tunnel Release (CTR) Using the Wongsiri Technique with MiniSURE

Introduction. The standard open technique for carpal tunnel surgery has wound problems and complications significantly more than minimally invasive surgery using the Wongsiri technique with MiniSURE Kit® (Surgical Innovation Healthcare Co., Ltd, Bangkok, Thailand) and in particular, the open technique surgery requires a longer time for return to work. CTR surgery with endoscopic devices improves the results with fewer wound problems when compared with the commonly used open technique; however, nerve complications and injury are more prevalent with endoscopic surgery than with the open technique. The Wongsiri technique produces good results with new medical devices such as the MiniSURE View, for improved vision and line-of-sight, and the MiniSURE Cut for improved and complete cutting via the supraretinacular technique that may reduce the nerve problems associated with endoscopic tooling in the carpal tunnel. Purpose. To evaluate the results of the operation and postoperative outcomes of the Wongsiri technique with a MiniSURE Kit®. Methods. 20 patients underwent carpal tunnel release using the Wongsiri technique and a MiniSURE Kit® with a five-step surgery: MIS starts when the surgeon makes a 1.5–1.8 cm incision, creates a working space, inserts the visual tube of MiniSURE View, inserts the freer, and then cuts the transverse carpal ligament by using the MiniSURE Cut. Results. All 20 successes of the Wongsiri technique and MiniSURE Kit® surgery occurred within 6.8 minutes operative time and a 12 mm wound size. A single outlier, in one case (6.7%), the patient experienced pillar pain which abated within one month. Patients can return to work in 7.3 days. Conclusions. The Wongsiri technique with the MiniSURE Kit® demonstrated good outcomes similar to the endoscope. By contrast with the endoscopic surgery, the Wongsiri technique with the MiniSURE Kit® reduced preop, operating, and postop time, many resources, and significant costs and resulted in no nerve problems or complications.

Review Article

Diagnosis and Treatment of Peritalar Injuries in the Acute Trauma Setting: A Review of the Literature

The bony and ligamentous structure of the foot is a complex kinematic interaction, designed to transmit force and motion in an energy-efficient and stable manner. Visible deformity of the foot or atypical patterns of swelling should raise significant concern for foot trauma. In some instances, disruption of either bony structure or supporting ligaments is identified years after injury due to chronic pain in the hindfoot or midfoot. This article will focus on injuries relating to the peritalar complex, the bony articulation between the tibia, talus, calcaneus, and navicular bones, supplemented with multiple ligamentous structures. Attention will be given to the five most common peritalar injuries to illustrate the nature of each and briefly describe methods for achieving the correct diagnosis in the context of acute trauma. This includes subtalar dislocations, chopart joint injuries, talar fractures, navicular fractures, and occult calcaneal fractures.

Research Article

The Impact of Preoperative Opioid Use Disorder on Complications and Costs following Primary Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

Introduction. Multiple studies have demonstrated that patients taking opioids in the preoperative period are at elevated risk for complications following total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. However, the incidence and impact of opioid use disorder (OUD) among these patients—both clinically and fiscally—remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate this relationship. Methods. The Nationwide Readmission Database (NRD) was used to identify patients undergoing THA and TKA from 2011 to 2015. Coarsened exact matching was used to statistically match the OUD and non-OUD cohorts. Further analysis was then conducted on matched cohorts with multivariate analysis. The incidence of OUD was also determined, and the costs associated with this comorbidity were calculated. Results. The incidence of OUD in arthroplasty patients increased 80% over the study period. OUD patients had higher odds of prosthetic joint infection (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.23–1.94), wound complication (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12–1.76), prosthetic complication (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.10–1.70), and revision surgery (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19–1.81). OUD patients also had longer length of stays (TKA: +0.67 days; THA: +1.09 days), higher readmission (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.43–1.79), and increased 90-day costs (TKA: +$3,602 [95% CI $3,138–4,065]; THA: +4,527 [95% CI $3,593–4,920). Conclusion. Opioid use disorder is becoming a more common comorbidity among THA and TKA patients. This is concerning as it represents a significant risk factor for postoperative complication. It additionally confers increased perioperative costs. Patients with OUD should be counseled on their elevated risk, and future work will be needed to determine if this is a modifiable risk factor.

Review Article

Total Hip Arthroplasty for Bilateral Femoral Neck Stress Fracture: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs) can be treated conservatively or surgically, depending on initial displacement and patient condition. Surgical treatment options include internal fixation, with or without valgus osteotomy or hip arthroplasty, either hemi or total. The latter is mainly considered when initial treatment fails. A review of the literature shows that total hip arthroplasty (THA) is only considered as primary treatment in displaced fractures (type 3) in low-demand patients. We present a case of successive bilateral FNSF in a young active patient, where a THA was performed on one side, after failed internal fixation, and where it was chosen as primary treatment on the other side after failed conservative treatment.

Research Article

Computation of Intersegmental Moments during Standing Posture: Can We Neglect the Horizontal Ground Reaction Force? Results from an Experimental Study

Background. The development of postural analysis thanks to force and pressure platforms, in order to determine the center of pressure, can be valuable in the setting of spinal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to compare “pressure” and “force” platforms for the evaluation of the center of pressure. In other words, can we neglect the horizontal ground reaction force in the evaluation of intersegmental moments during standing posture? Methods. Postural data from two healthy adult volunteers were analyzed. Analysis of the posture was done according to a protocol providing sagittal intersegmental moments. A set of 36 markers was used to divide the body in 10 segments. Postacquisition calculations were done in order to obtain the sagittal net intersegmental moments. To evaluate the differences in intersegmental moments between force and pressure platforms, the postacquisition calculations were done with a simulated pressure platform. Mean intersegmental moments between each body segment for each volunteer were compared. Findings. There were significant differences between the 2 platforms in intersegmental moments for the lumbo-sacral junction, hips, knees, and ankles (). All differences were inferior to intrasubject variability measured with the force platform (). Results from intra- and interobserver comparisons showed that differences measured with the pressure platform were all inferior to the standard error obtained with the force platform for every intersegmental moment (). Interpretation. The use of a simulated pressure platform to determine intersegmental moments has the same clinical efficiency as force platforms. Moreover, the possibility to set the platform into the radiograph room will allow in a second time a correlation between radiographic parameters and biomechanical constraints applied to the spine.

Research Article

Not All SLAPs Are Created Equal: A Comparison of Patients with Planned and Incidental SLAP Repair Procedures

Background. EpidemiologicalIt is very important for the corresponding author to have a linked ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) account on MTS. To register a linked ORCID account, please go to the Account Update page (http://mts.hindawi.com/update/) in our Manuscript Tracking System and after you have logged in click on the ORCID link at the top of the page. This link will take you to the ORCID website where you will be able to create an account for yourself. Once you have done so, your new ORCID will be saved in our Manuscript Tracking System automatically."?> studies have shown a progressive increase in the rate of superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair surgery after the year 2000. However, it is not clear whether this is due to increased recognition of isolated SLAP tears or increased SLAP repair performed secondarily during arthroscopy for other purposes. Hypothesis/Purpose. We hypothesized that both isolated SLAP repair and secondary SLAP repair increased with time and that patient age influenced the pathway to SLAP diagnosis and surgery—such that younger patients were more likely to have isolated SLAP repair surgery after being diagnosed in clinic. Study Design. Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods. Data were obtained from the MarketScan database from 2003 to 2013. CPT and ICD-9 codes were used to identify SLAP surgery patients and concomitant procedures. The timing of SLAP diagnosis relative to surgery was used to determine whether the injury was recognized preoperatively. Results. 64,497 SLAP surgery patients were included. Preoperative SLAP diagnosis increased from 17.1% in 2003 to 44.6% in 2013. Patients diagnosed preoperatively were younger and had fewer concomitant procedures. Increasing age and concomitant rotator cuff tear (RCT) repair corresponded to lower odds of preoperative SLAP diagnosis. Discussion. Younger patients were more likely to have their SLAP tear diagnosed prior to surgery. Those diagnosed before surgery had fewer simultaneous procedures during their operations, suggesting that SLAP repair was more likely the primary operation. From 2003 to 2013, SLAP tears were increasingly recognized in the preoperative setting.

Advances in Orthopedics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication41 days
CiteScore1.630
Impact Factor-
 Submit