Advances in Orthopedics
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Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision52 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore1.630
Impact Factor-
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Effectiveness of Surgical Treatment in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Mini-Incision Using MIS-CTS Kits: A Cadaveric Study

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 Journal profile

Advances in Orthopedics provides a forum for orthopaedics working on improving the quality of orthopedic health care. Topics relate to arthroplasty, hand surgery, limb reconstruction, pediatric orthopaedics, sports medicine etc.

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Advances in Orthopedics maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Clinical Study

The Value of Routine Intravenous Tranexamic Acid in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Preliminary Study

Objective. To determine the effect on the need for transfusion when intravenous tranexamic acid (TXA) is administered intraoperatively in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA). Method. A prospective, double blinded, randomised control trial of 88 patients undergoing THA was randomly allocated to receive 1 g of intravenous TXA or normal saline on induction of anaesthesia. All patients received spinal anaesthesia. The primary outcome measure was transfusion rate, and the secondary outcomes were intraoperative blood loss, haemoglobin levels, length of hospital stay, functional scores, and thromboembolic complications. Results. 19.0% of patients given TXA required a blood transfusion, compared with 20.5% given placebo (). Secondary outcomes included mean intraoperative blood loss, which was 536.5 ml in the TXA group and 469.8 ml in the placebo group (). Day 1 haemoglobin levels were 108.9 g/l in the TXA group versus 104.3 g/l in the placebo group (). Day 4 haemoglobin levels were 105.0 g/l and 99.8 g/l, respectively (). The mean length of stay in those who received TXA was 4.3days, compared with 4.8days in those given placebo (). The Oxford Hip Score showed a mean improvement over a 1-year period of 25.9 points in those who received TXA, compared with 26.7 points in those who received placebo (). There were two treatment emergent adverse events: a pulmonary embolism (TXA) and a myocardial infarction (placebo). Conclusions. 1 g IV TXA administered on induction did not significantly reduce the need for blood transfusion, postoperative blood loss, functional scores, or the length of stay in patients undergoing THA. This trial is registered with ACTRN12610001065088.

Research Article

Correlation between Findings in Physical Examination, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Nerve Conduction Studies in Lumbosacral Radiculopathy Caused by Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation

Purpose. The aim of this study was to find out the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nerve conduction studies’ (NCS) findings in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy caused by lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In addition, the study aimed at finding the correlation between the clinical manifestations of lumbosacral radiculopathy and both MRI and NCS. Patients and Methods. The study was a cross-sectional analytic study which included thirty patients with a history suggestive of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients who had an MRI confirmed L4/5 and/or L5/S1 intervertebral disc prolapse in addition to one or more of the following (dermatomal distribution of symptoms appropriate with MRI level, presence of motor weakness, sensory impairment, absent ankle jerk, or positive straight leg raising test). All patients underwent clinical assessment and NCS, and their MRI examination was reviewed. The Chi-Squared/Fisher’s exact test was used to test the correlation. Results. There was a statistically significant correlation between abnormal physical findings and nerve root compression in MRI. Statistically significant correlation was neither found between abnormal physical examination findings and abnormal NCS nor between nerve root compression in MRI and abnormal NCS findings. Conclusion. Abnormal neurological examination findings can be used to predict nerve root compression in MRI examination. On the contrary, positive findings of physical examination do not predict abnormal NCS, as well as negative findings do not exclude abnormal NCS; therefore, it is useful to add NCS when MRI findings do not match clinical examination findings or when no neuroimaging abnormalities can be identified.

Research Article

A Biomechanical Comparison of Two Techniques of Latarjet Procedure in Cadaveric Shoulders

Traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder is commonly treated with the Latarjet procedure, which involves transfer of the coracoid process with a conjoint tendon to the anterior aspect of the glenoid. The two most common techniques of the Latarjet are the classical and congruent arc techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in force required to dislocate the shoulder after classical and congruent arc Latarjet procedures were performed. Fourteen cadaveric shoulders were dissected and osteotomised to produce a bony Bankart lesion of 25% of the articular surface leading to an “inverted pear-shaped” glenoid. An anteroinferior force was applied whilst the arm was in abduction and external rotation using a pulley system. The force needed to dislocate was noted, and then the shoulders underwent coracoid transfer with the classical and congruent arc techniques. The average force required to dislocate the shoulder after osteotomy was 123.57 N. After classical Latarjet, the average force required was 325.71 N, compared with 327.14 N after the congruent arc technique. This was not statistically significant. In this biomechanical cadaveric study, there is no difference in the force required to dislocate a shoulder after classical and congruent arc techniques of Latarjet, suggesting that both methods are equally effective at preventing anterior dislocation in the position of abduction and external rotation.

Research Article

Minimally Invasive Carpal Tunnel Release (CTR) Using the Wongsiri Technique with MiniSURE

Introduction. The standard open technique for carpal tunnel surgery has wound problems and complications significantly more than minimally invasive surgery using the Wongsiri technique with MiniSURE Kit® (Surgical Innovation Healthcare Co., Ltd, Bangkok, Thailand) and in particular, the open technique surgery requires a longer time for return to work. CTR surgery with endoscopic devices improves the results with fewer wound problems when compared with the commonly used open technique; however, nerve complications and injury are more prevalent with endoscopic surgery than with the open technique. The Wongsiri technique produces good results with new medical devices such as the MiniSURE View, for improved vision and line-of-sight, and the MiniSURE Cut for improved and complete cutting via the supraretinacular technique that may reduce the nerve problems associated with endoscopic tooling in the carpal tunnel. Purpose. To evaluate the results of the operation and postoperative outcomes of the Wongsiri technique with a MiniSURE Kit®. Methods. 20 patients underwent carpal tunnel release using the Wongsiri technique and a MiniSURE Kit® with a five-step surgery: MIS starts when the surgeon makes a 1.5–1.8 cm incision, creates a working space, inserts the visual tube of MiniSURE View, inserts the freer, and then cuts the transverse carpal ligament by using the MiniSURE Cut. Results. All 20 successes of the Wongsiri technique and MiniSURE Kit® surgery occurred within 6.8 minutes operative time and a 12 mm wound size. A single outlier, in one case (6.7%), the patient experienced pillar pain which abated within one month. Patients can return to work in 7.3 days. Conclusions. The Wongsiri technique with the MiniSURE Kit® demonstrated good outcomes similar to the endoscope. By contrast with the endoscopic surgery, the Wongsiri technique with the MiniSURE Kit® reduced preop, operating, and postop time, many resources, and significant costs and resulted in no nerve problems or complications.

Review Article

Diagnosis and Treatment of Peritalar Injuries in the Acute Trauma Setting: A Review of the Literature

The bony and ligamentous structure of the foot is a complex kinematic interaction, designed to transmit force and motion in an energy-efficient and stable manner. Visible deformity of the foot or atypical patterns of swelling should raise significant concern for foot trauma. In some instances, disruption of either bony structure or supporting ligaments is identified years after injury due to chronic pain in the hindfoot or midfoot. This article will focus on injuries relating to the peritalar complex, the bony articulation between the tibia, talus, calcaneus, and navicular bones, supplemented with multiple ligamentous structures. Attention will be given to the five most common peritalar injuries to illustrate the nature of each and briefly describe methods for achieving the correct diagnosis in the context of acute trauma. This includes subtalar dislocations, chopart joint injuries, talar fractures, navicular fractures, and occult calcaneal fractures.

Research Article

The Impact of Preoperative Opioid Use Disorder on Complications and Costs following Primary Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

Introduction. Multiple studies have demonstrated that patients taking opioids in the preoperative period are at elevated risk for complications following total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. However, the incidence and impact of opioid use disorder (OUD) among these patients—both clinically and fiscally—remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate this relationship. Methods. The Nationwide Readmission Database (NRD) was used to identify patients undergoing THA and TKA from 2011 to 2015. Coarsened exact matching was used to statistically match the OUD and non-OUD cohorts. Further analysis was then conducted on matched cohorts with multivariate analysis. The incidence of OUD was also determined, and the costs associated with this comorbidity were calculated. Results. The incidence of OUD in arthroplasty patients increased 80% over the study period. OUD patients had higher odds of prosthetic joint infection (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.23–1.94), wound complication (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12–1.76), prosthetic complication (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.10–1.70), and revision surgery (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19–1.81). OUD patients also had longer length of stays (TKA: +0.67 days; THA: +1.09 days), higher readmission (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.43–1.79), and increased 90-day costs (TKA: +$3,602 [95% CI $3,138–4,065]; THA: +4,527 [95% CI $3,593–4,920). Conclusion. Opioid use disorder is becoming a more common comorbidity among THA and TKA patients. This is concerning as it represents a significant risk factor for postoperative complication. It additionally confers increased perioperative costs. Patients with OUD should be counseled on their elevated risk, and future work will be needed to determine if this is a modifiable risk factor.

Advances in Orthopedics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision52 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore1.630
Impact Factor-
 Submit