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Advances in Orthopedics
Volume 2014, Article ID 954208, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/954208
Clinical Study

Early Clinical and Radiographic Results of Minimally Invasive Anterior Approach Hip Arthroplasty

1Department of Orthopaedics, Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center, 1200 N. State Street, GNH 3900, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
2University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center, 1200 N. State Street, GNH 3900, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
3University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, USC University Hospital, 1510 San Pablo Street, Suite 634, Los Angeles, CA 90033-4608, USA

Received 18 October 2013; Revised 8 January 2014; Accepted 21 January 2014; Published 2 March 2014

Academic Editor: Christian Bach

Copyright © 2014 Tamara Alexandrov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We present a retrospective review of the early results and complications in a series of 35 consecutive patients with 43 total hip arthroplasties performed through an anterior muscle sparing minimally invasive approach. We found the early complication rates and radiographic outcomes comparable to those reported from arthroplasties performed via traditional approaches. Complications included dislocation (2%), femur fracture (2%), greater trochanteric fracture (12%), postoperative periprosthetic intertrochanteric fracture (2%), femoral nerve palsy (5%), hematoma (2%), and postoperative iliopsoas avulsion (2%). Radiographic analysis revealed average cup anteversion of , average cup abduction angle of , stem varus of , and a mean leg length discrepancy of 0.7 mm. The anterior approach to the hip is an attractive alternative to the more traditional approaches. Acceptable component placement with comparable complication rates is possible using a muscle sparing technique which may lead to faster overall recovery.