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Advances in Preventive Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 874048, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/874048
Research Article

Lowering the Risk of Rectal Cancer among Habitual Beer Drinkers by Dietary Means

1Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, 41 Power Street, Toorak, VIC 3142, Australia
2Mother and Child Health Research, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia

Received 28 June 2010; Revised 8 November 2010; Accepted 18 January 2011

Academic Editor: William Cho

Copyright © 2011 Gabriel Kune and Lyndsey Watson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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