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Advances in Preventive Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 731604, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/731604
Review Article

Advanced Development of the rF1V and rBV A/B Vaccines: Progress and Challenges

1DynPort Vaccine Company LLC, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
2Bacteriology Division, USAMRIID, Frederick, MD 21701, USA

Received 29 April 2011; Revised 20 July 2011; Accepted 21 July 2011

Academic Editor: Kelly T. McKee

Copyright © 2012 Mary Kate Hart et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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