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Advances in Preventive Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 614723, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/614723
Review Article

EEG Derived Neuronal Dynamics during Meditation: Progress and Challenges

Panjab University, Chandigarh 160036, India

Received 22 September 2015; Revised 11 November 2015; Accepted 15 November 2015

Academic Editor: Guido Dietrich

Copyright © 2015 Chamandeep Kaur and Preeti Singh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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