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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 378278, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/378278
Review Article

Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

1Division of Cell Biology, Department of Health Science, Graduate School of Sports and Health Science, Daito Bunka University, 560 Iwadono, Higashi-Matsuyama, Saitama 355-8501, Japan
2Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
3Department of Bioinformatics, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan

Received 1 May 2011; Revised 9 July 2011; Accepted 25 July 2011

Academic Editor: Omar M. E. Abdel-Salam

Copyright © 2011 Satoru Oshiro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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