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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2011, Article ID 790590, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/790590
Review Article

Augmentation of Tonic GABAA Inhibition in Absence Epilepsy: Therapeutic Value of Inverse Agonists at Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

1School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3US, UK
2Neuroscience Division, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK

Received 17 March 2011; Accepted 16 May 2011

Academic Editor: Keith Wafford

Copyright © 2011 Adam C. Errington et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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