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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2015, Article ID 164943, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/164943
Research Article

Pharmacological Evaluation of Antidepressant-Like Effect of Genistein and Its Combination with Amitriptyline: An Acute and Chronic Study

1Department of Life Science, School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Bukit Jalil, Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia
2School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia
3School of Biomedical Science, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia

Received 14 September 2015; Revised 23 October 2015; Accepted 26 October 2015

Academic Editor: Berend Olivier

Copyright © 2015 Gaurav Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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