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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2015, Article ID 823539, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/823539
Review Article

Therapeutic Potential of Dietary Phenolic Acids

1Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Haryana, Gurgaon, Manesar 122413, India
2Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025, India

Received 26 May 2015; Revised 3 August 2015; Accepted 18 August 2015

Academic Editor: Robert Gogal

Copyright © 2015 Venkata Saibabu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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