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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2016, Article ID 7238679, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7238679
Review Article

The Influence of Palatable Diets in Reward System Activation: A Mini Review

1Pharmacology of Pain and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Graduate Program in Biological Sciences-Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Graduate Program of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Institute of Toxicology, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 3 November 2015; Revised 12 February 2016; Accepted 16 February 2016

Academic Editor: Berend Olivier

Copyright © 2016 Isabel Cristina de Macedo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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