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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7801924, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7801924
Research Article

Chemical Composition and Cytotoxic and Antibacterial Activities of the Essential Oil of Aloysia citriodora Palau Grown in Morocco

Laboratory of Biological Engineering, Natural Substances, Cellular and Molecular Immuno-Pharmacology, Immunobiology of Cancer Cells Cluster, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sultan Moulay Slimane University, Beni Mellal, Morocco

Correspondence should be addressed to Abdelmajid Zyad

Received 1 March 2017; Revised 24 April 2017; Accepted 11 May 2017; Published 12 June 2017

Academic Editor: Robert Gogal

Copyright © 2017 Moulay Ali Oukerrou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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