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Archaea
Volume 2015, Article ID 282035, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/282035
Review Article

Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

1School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
2Australian Centre for Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 5 February 2015; Revised 7 July 2015; Accepted 8 July 2015

Academic Editor: Juergen Wiegel

Copyright © 2015 James C. Charlesworth and Brendan P. Burns. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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