Archaea

Biotechnological Uses of Archaeal Proteins


Status
Published

1University of Nantes, Nantes, France

2University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

3University of Georgia, Athens, USA


Biotechnological Uses of Archaeal Proteins

Description

Many industrial/biotechnological processes take place under extreme conditions of temperature, pH, salinity, or pressure which are not suitable for activities of proteins from usual eukaryotic or prokaryotic microorganisms. In contrast, Archaea offer a large panel of extremophile organisms that express proteins able to remain properly folded and functional under the harshest biophysical conditions.

For years, the study of this group of organisms has uncovered archaeal proteins with unusual properties compared to their traditional counterparts, mainly to use them as biocatalysts. However, use of archeal proteins has also been reported recently to design artificial affinity reagents as alternatives to antibodies to detect, capture, or inhibit targets. These last years, with the emergence of next generation sequencing techniques to decode whole genomes and the pressure to develop “greener” industrial processes, the rate of new archeal proteins reported has significantly increased, thereby widening their potential of applications.

For this special issue, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles, which summarize recent findings and progresses made for using archaeal proteins as tools for various fields of biotechnologies.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development and use of archaeal enzymes as tools for molecular biology (such as polymerases)
  • Development and use of archeal proteins as scaffolds to derive affinity reagents
  • Identification of new archaeal enzymes with applications for biofuel production
  • Archaeal enzymes as biocatalysts for “green” chemistry
  • Archaeal enzymes for medical applications
  • Tailoring of archaeal proteins (protein engineering)
  • Archeal homologues in crystallography

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 912582
  • - Review Article

Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

Chang-Hao Wu | Patrick M. McTernan | ... | Michael W. W. Adams
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 809758
  • - Editorial

Biotechnological Uses of Archaeal Proteins

Frédéric Pecorari | Vickery L. Arcus | Juergen Wiegel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 978632
  • - Research Article

A Novel Highly Thermostable Multifunctional Beta-Glycosidase from Crenarchaeon Acidilobus saccharovorans

Vadim M. Gumerov | Andrey L. Rakitin | ... | Nikolai V. Ravin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 305497
  • - Review Article

Archaeal MCM Proteins as an Analog for the Eukaryotic Mcm2–7 Helicase to Reveal Essential Features of Structure and Function

Justin M. Miller | Eric J. Enemark
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 267570
  • - Review Article

From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

Maiko Tanabe | Yoshizumi Ishino | Hirokazu Nishida
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 282035
  • - Review Article

Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

James C. Charlesworth | Brendan P. Burns
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 170571
  • - Review Article

Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

Cecilia R. Chambers | Wayne M. Patrick
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 147671
  • - Review Article

Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

Jennifer A. Littlechild
Archaea
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
Acceptance to publication-
CiteScore5.400
Impact Factor3.379
 Submit

We are committed to sharing findings related to COVID-19 as quickly as possible. We will be providing unlimited waivers of publication charges for accepted research articles as well as case reports and case series related to COVID-19. Review articles are excluded from this waiver policy. Sign up here as a reviewer to help fast-track new submissions.