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Anesthesiology Research and Practice
Volume 2013, Article ID 723168, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/723168
Research Article

Anesthesia with Propofol versus Sevoflurane: Does the Longer Neuromuscular Block under Sevoflurane Anesthesia Reduce Laryngeal Injuries?

1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 35, 18057 Rostock, Germany
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Rostock, 18057 Rostock, Germany

Received 20 November 2012; Revised 21 January 2013; Accepted 21 January 2013

Academic Editor: Kouichiro Minami

Copyright © 2013 Thomas Mencke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Anesthesia can be maintained with propofol or sevoflurane. Volatile anesthetics increase neuromuscular block of muscle relaxants. We tested the hypothesis, that sevoflurane would cause less vocal cord injuries than an intravenous anesthesia with propofol. In this prospective trial, 65 patients were randomized in 2 groups: SEVO group, anesthesia with sevoflurane, and TIVA group, total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Intubating and extubating conditions were evaluated. Vocal cord injuries were examined by stroboscopy before and 24 and 72 h after surgery; hoarseness and sore throat were assessed up to 72 h after surgery. Hoarseness and sore throat were comparable between both groups (not significant). Similar findings were observed for vocal cord injuries: 9 (SEVO) versus 5 (TIVA) patients; ; the overall incidence was 24%. Type of vocal cord injuries: 9 erythema and 5 edema of the vocal folds. Neuromuscular block was significantly longer in the SEVO group compared with the TIVA group: 71 (range: 38–148) min versus 52 (range: 21–74) min; . Five patients (TIVA group) versus 11 patients (SEVO group) needed neostigmine to achieve a TOF ratio of 1.0 . Under anesthesia with propofol laryngeal injuries were not increased; the risk for residual curarization, however, was lower compared with sevoflurane.