Anesthesiology Research and Practice
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Acceptance rate46%
Submission to final decision70 days
Acceptance to publication34 days
CiteScore1.320
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Quo Vadis PCA? A Review on Current Concepts, Economic Considerations, Patient-Related Aspects, and Future Development with respect to Patient-Controlled Analgesia

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Anesthesiology Research and Practice provides a forum for health care professionals engaged in perioperative medicine, critical care, and pain management. Topics include anesthetic administration, preoperative and postoperative considerations etc.

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Anesthesiology Research and Practice maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

The Effect of Perioperative Music Listening on Patient Satisfaction, Anxiety, and Depression: A Quasiexperimental Study

Background. The effect of perioperative music listening has been proven to relieve preoperative anxiety and depression, while improving patient satisfaction. However, music listening has not been extensively studied in Singapore. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to investigate the patient satisfaction towards perioperative music listening in the local setting. The secondary aim is to investigate the effect of perioperative music listening in reducing patient surgery-related anxiety and depression. Methods. After obtaining ethics board approval, we conducted a quasiexperimental study on a cohort of female patients who were undergoing elective minor gynaecological surgeries. Apple iPod Touch™ devices containing playlists of selected music genres and noise-cancelling earphones were given to patients to listen during the preoperative and postoperative periods. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, music listening preferences, and patient satisfaction surveys were administered. Wilcoxon signed-rank and McNemar’s tests for paired data were used for analysis. Results. 83 patients were analysed with 97.6% of patients in the preoperative period and 98.8% of patients in the postoperative period were satisfied with music listening. The median (IQR [range]) score for preintervention HADS anxiety was 7.0 (6.0 [0–17]), significantly higher than that in postintervention at 2.0 (4.0 [0–12]) (). Similarly, there was a significant reduction in preintervention HADS depression as compared to postintervention (). These results were corroborated by similar findings from the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire. Conclusion. Perioperative music listening improved patient satisfaction and can reduce patient anxiety and depression. We hope to further investigate on how wider implementation of perioperative music listening could improve patient care.

Research Article

Incidence and Associated Factors of Laryngospasm among Pediatric Patients Who Underwent Surgery under General Anesthesia, in University of Gondar Compressive Specialized Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, 2019: A Cross-Sectional Study

Introduction. Laryngospasm is a glottis closure due to reflex constriction of the laryngeal muscles. It can occur at any phase of the anesthetic. Different studies have been done previously with various results and indicative values which initiated us to do this research. This study aimed to assess the incidence and associated factors of laryngospasm among pediatric patients who underwent surgery under general anesthesia (GA). Methods. Institution-based, cross-sectional study was conducted on pediatric patients from February to August, 2019, in University of Gondar Comprehensive Specialized Hospital (UOGCSH). Data were entered and analyzed with SPSS version 20. Variables with value less than <0.2 in bivariate analysis were fitted into the multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify factors associated with laryngospasm. Both crude and adjusted odds ratio with 95% CI were calculated to show strength of association. In multivariable analysis, value of <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results. The incidence of laryngospasm among pediatric patients who underwent surgery under GA was 57 (18.4%). Of this, 34 (59.6%), 12 (21.1%), and 11 (19.3%) happened during emergence, maintenance, and induction phases of GA, respectively. In multivariable analysis, airway anomalies (AOR: 14.64, 95% CI: 1.71, 125.04), secretion (AOR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.19, 5.06), attempts of airway devices (AOR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.16, 5.22), upper respiratory tract infection (AOR: 2.91, 95% CI: 1.008, 8.41), and inadequate depth of anesthesia (AOR: 7.92, 95% CI: 2.7, 23.22) were significantly associated with incidence of laryngospasm. Conclusions. Laryngospasm can occur at any phase of the anesthetic. At UOGCSH, the overall rate of laryngospasm was 18.4%, with the vast majority of episodes occurring on emergence. Inadequate depth of anesthesia, URTI, airway anomalies, multiple attempts of airway devices, and oropharyngeal secretion were predictors of laryngospasm. So, added vigilance is needed in patients with URTI, airway anomalies, or those who require multiple attempts at airway device insertion. Prompt clearing of airway secretions and adequate depth of anesthesia may help to prevent laryngospasm. Since the majority of our patients received an IV induction, endotracheal intubation, and maintenance with halothane, caution must be taken in extrapolating these results to other patient populations.

Research Article

Epidural Needle Extension through the Ligamentum Flavum Using the Standard versus the CompuFlo®-Assisted Loss of Resistance to Saline Technique: A Simulation Study

Background. The CompuFlo® epidural system has been recently introduced and validated as an objective and sensible tool to detect the epidural space. We aimed to verify whether the high sensitivity of the instrument may help the anesthesiologist to identify the epidural space very early, limiting the extension of the Tuohy needle into the epidural space. Methods. In this prospective, simulation study, we evaluated the Tuohy needle extension through a simulated ligamentum flavum during the epidural procedure performed by 52 expert anesthesiologists by using the CompuFlo® epidural instrument or their standard loss of resistance to saline technique (LORT). Results. The mean (SD) needle extension length was 3.90 (3.71) mm in the standard technique group and 0.68 (0.46) mm in the CompuFlo® group (). The extremely reduced variability of the data in the CompuFlo® group (F test 0.01) made the results obtained with this instrument highly predictable. Conclusions. Puncturing high-resistance material that simulated the ligamentum flavum, the use of CompuFlo® has determined the arrest of the needle more precociously when compared with the traditional LORT.

Research Article

Success and Challenge When Returning to Clinical Practice: A Case Series in Anesthesiologist Re-Entry

Introduction. Anesthesiologists returning to clinical practice pose unique challenges for licensing and credentialing boards. Few institutions provide re-education. We describe the physician refresher/re-entry program at our College of Medicine. Methods. We launched the physician re-entry program in 2006. This individualized program re-educates physicians who left clinical practice for any reason and are seeking to return. We report results achieved for 12 anesthesiologists who successfully completed the course between August 2012 and February 2018. Results. Seven men and five women left their practices for various reasons, which included relocation, family or medical reasons, substance use, and burnout. None left practice for medical negligence. Range away from clinical activity was 0–10 years. Five had active licenses. Seven were US graduates and five were international. Nine of 12 achieved their goals. Of the 3 others, 1 did not pursue her goal, another did not obtain a residency, and the other just finished the program. Seven out of 9 (78%) achieved their goal within 1 year of course completion. Discussion. Despite our small sample size, our experience to successfully return inactive physicians to the workforce adds to the scant literature and experience in refreshing inactive physicians. Our trainees return to practice serving communities across the country and are now a pivotal part of the anesthesiology workforce. Thus, this program not only services individual physicians, but the whole community affected by their absence.

Research Article

A Five-Year Data Report of Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Focusing on Early Complications

Background. Long-term venous access has become the standard practice for the administration of chemotherapy, fluid therapy, antibiotics, and parenteral nutrition. The most commonly used methods are percutaneous puncture of the subclavian and internal jugular veins using the Seldinger technique or surgical cutdown of the cephalic vein. Methods. This study is based on a quality registry including all long-term central venous catheter insertion procedures performed in patients >18 years at our department during a five-year period. The following data were registered: demographic data, main diagnosis and indications for the procedure, preoperative blood samples, type of catheter, the venous access used, and the procedure time. In addition, procedural and early postoperative complications were registered: unsuccessful procedures, malpositioned catheters, pneumothorax, hematoma complications, infections, nerve injuries, and wound ruptures. The Seldinger technique using anatomical landmarks at the left subclavian vein was the preferred access. Fluoroscopy was not used. Results. One thousand one hundred and one procedures were performed. In eight (0.7%) cases, the insertion of a catheter was not possible, 23 (2.1%) catheters were incorrectly positioned, twelve (1.1%) patients developed pneumothorax, nine (0.8%) developed hematoma, and three (0.27%) developed infection postoperatively. One (0.1%) patient suffered nerve injury, which totally recovered. No wound ruptures were observed. Conclusions. We have a high success rate of first-attempt insertions compared with other published data, as well as an acceptable and low rate of pneumothorax, hematoma, and infections. However, the number of malpositioned catheters was relatively high. This could probably have been avoided with routine use of fluoroscopy during the procedure.

Research Article

Effect of Depth of Total Intravenous General Anesthesia on Intraoperative Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potentials in Cochlear Implantation Surgery

Purpose. This study aims to compare the effect of the depth of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) on intraoperative electrically evoked compound action potential (e-ECAP) thresholds in cochlear implant operations. Methods. Prospectively, a total of 39 patients aged between 1 and 48 years who were scheduled to undergo cochlear implantation surgeries were enrolled in this study. Every patient received both light and deep TIVA during the cochlear implant surgery. The e-ECAP thresholds were obtained during the light and deep TIVA. Results. After comparing the e-ECAP means for each electrode (lead) between the light and deep anesthesia, no significant differences were detected between the light and deep anesthesia. Conclusion. The depth of TIVA may have no significant influence on the e-ECAP thresholds as there was no statistical difference between the light and deep anesthesia.

Anesthesiology Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate46%
Submission to final decision70 days
Acceptance to publication34 days
CiteScore1.320
Impact Factor-
 Submit