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Anesthesiology Research and Practice
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 459432, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/459432
Clinical Study

Cost Analysis of Three Techniques of Administering Sevoflurane

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Shahdara, Delhi 110095, India

Received 1 July 2014; Accepted 3 October 2014; Published 29 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jean Jacques Lehot

Copyright © 2014 Asha Tyagi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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