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Anesthesiology Research and Practice
Volume 2015, Article ID 971406, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/971406
Research Article

Web-Based Learning for Emergency Airway Management in Anesthesia Residency Training

1Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
2Biostatistics Unit, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, McMaster University, 50 Charlton East, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 4A6
3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1

Received 20 September 2015; Accepted 29 November 2015

Academic Editor: Daniel E. Lee

Copyright © 2015 Ada Hindle et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Web-based learning (WBL) is increasingly used in medical education; however, residency training programs often lack guidance on its implementation. We describe how the use of feasibility studies can guide the use of WBL in anesthesia residency training. Methods. Two case-based WBL emergency airway management modules were developed for self-directed use by anesthesia residents. The feasibility of using this educational modality was assessed using a single cohort pretest/posttest design. Outcome measures included user recruitment and retention rate, perceptions of educational value, and knowledge improvement. The differences between pre- and postmodule test scores and survey Likert scores were analysed using the paired test. Results. Recruitment and retention rates were 90% and 65%, respectively. User-friendliness of the modules was rated highly. There was a significant improvement in perceptions of the value of WBL in the postsurvey. There was a significant knowledge improvement of 29% in the postmodule test. Conclusions. Feasibility studies can help guide appropriate use of WBL in curricula. While our study supported the potential feasibility of emergency airway management modules for training, collaboration with other anesthesia residency programs may enable more efficient development, implementation, and evaluation of this resource-intensive modality in anesthesia education and practice.