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Anesthesiology Research and Practice
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 6107674, 6 pages
Research Article

Effectiveness of Bilateral Superficial Cervical Plexus Block as Part of Postoperative Analgesia for Patients Undergoing Thyroidectomy in Empress Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

1Dilla University, Dila, Ethiopia
2Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Wosenyeleh A. Sahile

Received 10 August 2017; Revised 11 November 2017; Accepted 4 December 2017; Published 21 January 2018

Academic Editor: Michael Frass

Copyright © 2018 Zemedu Aweke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Introduction. The pain after thyroid surgery is considered of moderate intensity and short duration. Most trials showed significant reduction in pain intensity and severity of pain in patients for whom bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (BSCPB) was done. Objective. To assess the postoperative analgesic effect of BSCPB for thyroid surgery. Methods. Sixty six euthyroid patients were recruited and assigned to two groups (33 patients each). Group 1 BSCPB and Group 2 standard analgesia. The unpaired Student’s t-test and Mann–Whitney test were used for comparison. Statistical significance was stated at value < 0.05. Results. The median postoperative pain score (NRS) was 3 in the BSCPB group and 5 in the control group . There was also statistically significant difference at 6th, 12th, and 24th hour showing a lower median pain score in the BSCPB group compared to the control group. The median time was (360 minutes) in the treatment group and (180 minutes) in the control group . The median tramadol consumption within 24 hours is 0 mg in the BSCPB group compared to 100 mg in the control group . Conclusion and Recommendation. BSCPB done for thyroidectomy under general anesthesia decreases the postoperative pain score, total analgesia consumption, and time to first analgesia request.