AIDS Research and Treatment
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Acceptance rate17%
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CiteScore3.200
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Real-World Experience with Dolutegravir-Based Two-Drug Regimens

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AIDS Research and Treatment publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies focused on all aspects of HIV and AIDS, from the molecular basis of the disease to translational and clinical research, prevention and education.

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Research Article

Perceptions of People Living with HIV and HIV Healthcare Providers on Real-Time Measuring and Monitoring of Antiretroviral Adherence Using Ingestible Sensors: A Qualitative Study

Objective. To describe and analyze the perception and attitudes of people living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV HCPs towards medication adherence with a focus on a digital medicine program (DMP) with ingestible sensors (ISs). Methods. This is a qualitative analysis pilot study of PLWH who were using DMP recruited by purposive sampling. A convenience sample of HCPs was interviewed. Semistructured interviews were conducted, and thematic analysis was performed. Results. Fifteen PLWH were interviewed, and thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: self-identified medication adherence patterns, experiences with the DMP, and recommending the DMP to others. Six health care providers (HCPs) described barriers and facilitators to adherence, as well as advantages and disadvantages of using or recommending the DMP to PLWH. Conclusion. This study evaluated participant and provider responses to DMP, which is a novel technology for real-time measuring and monitoring adherence with the IS. Participant and provider responses were mixed, highlighting both the advantages and limitations of the technology. Practice Implications. Taking PLWH experiences into consideration will enhance the development of this and other useful tools that clinicians and researchers can use for enhanced patient care.

Research Article

Hospitalization and Predictors of Inpatient Mortality among HIV-Infected Patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Jimma, Ethiopia: Prospective Observational Study

Despite the number of patients enrolled in ART is increased, HIV/AIDS continues to constitute a significant proportion of medical admissions and risk of mortality in low- and middle-income countries. As one of these countries, the case in Ethiopia is not different. The aim of this study was thus to assess reasons for hospitalization, discharge outcomes, and predictors of inpatient mortality among people living with HIV (PLWH) in Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH), Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia. Prospective observational study was conducted in medical wards of JUSH from February 17th to August 17th, 2017. In this study, 101 PLWH admitted during the study period were included. To identify the predictors of mortality, multiple logistic regression analysis was employed. Of the 101 hospitalized PLWH, 62 (61.4%) of them were females and most of them (52.5%) were between 25 and 34 years of age. A majority (79.2%) of the study participants were known HIV patients, before their admission. Tuberculosis (24.8%), infections of the nervous system (18.8%), and pneumonia (9.9%) comprised more than half of the reasons for hospitalization. Moreover, drug-related toxicity was a reason for hospitalization of 6 (5.9%) patients. Outcomes of hospitalization indicated that the overall inpatient mortality was 18 (17.8%). The median CD4 cell counts for survivors and deceased patients were 202 cells/μL (IQR, 121–295 cells/μL) and 70 cells/μL (IQR, 42–100 cells/μL), respectively. Neurologic complications (AOR = 13.97; 95% CI: 2.32–84.17, ), CD4 count ≤ 100 cells/μl (AOR = 16.40; 95% CI: 2.88–93.42, ), and short hospital stay (AOR = 12.98, 95% CI: 2.13–78.97, ) were found to be significant predictors of inpatient mortality. In conclusion, opportunistic infections are the main reason of hospitalization in PLWH.

Research Article

Prediction of CD4 T-Lymphocyte Count Using WHO Clinical Staging among ART-Naïve HIV-Infected Adolescents and Adults in Northern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study

Background. WHO clinical staging has long been used to assess the immunological status of HIV-infected patients at initiation of antiretroviral therapy and during treatment follow-up. In setups where CD4 count determination is not readily available, WHO clinical staging is a viable option. However, correlation between CD4 count and WHO clinical staging is not known in an Ethiopian setting, and hence, the main aim of this study was to assess predictability of CD4 T-lymphocyte count using WHO clinical staging among ART-naïve HIV-infected adolescents and adults in northern Ethiopia. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional study was done in the Tigray Region, Ethiopia, from April 2015 to January 2019 from a secondary database of 19525 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment. Analysis was done using STATA-14.0 to estimate the frequencies, mean, and median of CD4 T-cell count in each WHO stages. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, kappa test, and correlations were calculated to show the relationships between WHO stages and CD T-cell count. Results. The sensitivity of WHO clinical staging to predict CD4 T-cell counts of <200 cells/μl was 94.17% with a specificity of 3.62%. The PPV was 49.03%, and the NPV was 3.62%. The sensitivity of WHO clinical staging to predict CD4 T-cell counts of <350 cells/μl was 94.75% with a specificity of 3.00%. The PPV was 75.81%, and the NPV was 15.09%. Similarly, the sensitivity of WHO clinical staging to predict CD4 T-cell counts of <500 cells/μl was 95.03% with a specificity of 2.73% and the PPV and NPV were 88.32% and 6.62%, respectively. The kappa agreement of WHO clinical stages was also insignificant when compared with the disaggregated CD4 counts in different categories. The correlation of WHO clinical staging was inversely associated with the CD4 count, and the magnitude of the correlation was 5.22%. Conclusions. The WHO clinical staging had high sensitivity but low specificity in predicting patients with CD4 count <200 cells/μl, <350 cells/μl, and <500 cells/μl. There was poor correlation and agreement between CD4 T-lymphocyte count and WHO clinical staging. Therefore, WHO clinical staging alone may not provide accurate information on the immunological status of patients, and hence, it is better to use the CDC definition rather than the WHO clinical definition.

Research Article

Viral Load Suppression after Enhanced Adherence Counseling and Its Predictors among High Viral Load HIV Seropositive People in North Wollo Zone Public Hospitals, Northeast Ethiopia, 2019: Retrospective Cohort Study

Background. The World Health Organization currently encourages enhanced adherence counseling for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive people with a high viral load count before a treatment switch to the second-line regimen, yet little is known about viral load suppression after the outcome of enhanced adherence counseling. Therefore, this study aimed to assess viral suppression after enhanced adherence counseling sessions and its predictors among high viral load HIV seropositive people. Methods. Institutional-based retrospective cohort study was conducted among 235 randomly selected HIV seropositive people who were on ART and had a high viral load (>1000 copies/ml) from June 2016 to January 2019. The proportion of viral load suppression after enhanced adherence counseling was determined. Time to completion of counseling sessions and time to second viral load tests were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier curve. Log binomial regression was used to identify predictors of viral re-suppression after enhanced adherence counseling sessions. Result. The overall viral load suppression after enhanced adherence counseling was 66.4% (60.0–72.4). The median time to start adherence counseling session after high viral load detected date was 8 weeks (IQR 4–8 weeks), and the median time to complete the counseling session was 13 weeks (IQR 8–25 weeks). The probability of viral load suppression was higher among females (ARR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.02–1.19) and higher educational status (ARR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.25–2.16). The probability of viral load suppression was lower among people who had 36–59 months duration on ART (ARR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.130–0.9491) and people who had > 10,000 baseline viral load count (ARR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.28–0.71). Conclusion. This study showed that viral suppression after enhanced adherence counseling was near to the WHO target (70%) but highlights gaps in time to enrolment into counseling session, timely completion of counseling session, and repeat viral load testing after completing the session.

Research Article

Trends and Adaptive Optimal Set Points of CD4+ Count Clinical Covariates at Each Phase of the HIV Disease Progression

In response to invasion by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the self-regulatory immune system attempts to restore the CD4+ count fluctuations. Consequently, many clinical covariates are bound to adapt too, but little is known about their corresponding new optimal set points. It has been reported that there exist few strongest clinical covariates of the CD4+ count. The objective of this study is to harness them for a streamlined application of multidimensional viewing lens (statistical models) to zoom into the behavioural patterns of the adaptive optimal set points. We further postulated that the optimal set points of some of the strongest covariates are possibly controlled by dietary conditions or otherwise to enhance the CD4+ count. This study investigated post-HIV infection (acute to therapy phases) records of 237 patients involving repeated measurements of 17 CD4+ count clinical covariates that were found to be the strongest. The overall trends showed either downwards, upwards, or irregular behaviour. Phase-specific trends were mostly different and unimaginable, with LDH and red blood cells producing the most complex CD4+ count behaviour. The approximate optimal set points for dietary-related covariates were total protein 60–100 g/L (acute phase), <85 g/L (early phase), <75 g/L (established phase), and >85 g/L (ART phase), whilst albumin approx. 30–50 g/L (acute), >45 g/L (early and established), and <37 g/L (ART). Sodium was desirable at approx. <45 mEq/L (acute and early), <132 mEq/L (established), and >134 mEq/L (ART). Overall, desirable approximates were albumin >42 g/L, total protein <75 g/L, and sodium <137 mEq/L. We conclude that the optimal set points of the strongest CD4+ count clinical covariates tended to drift and adapt to either new ranges or overlapped with the known reference ranges to positively influence the CD4+ cell counts. Recommendation for phase-specific CD4+ cell count influence in adaptation to HIV invasion includes monitoring of the strongest covariates related to dietary conditions (sodium, albumin, and total protein), tissue oxygenation (red blood cells and its haematocrit), and hormonal control (LDH and ALP).

Research Article

Viral Suppression and Its Associated Factors in HIV Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART): A Retrospective Study in the Ho Municipality, Ghana

Background. The WHO targets to end HIV/AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. The introduction of the ambitious “90-90-90” strategy to attain this target is expected to be achieved by the year 2020. However, there is lack of regional data, especially on the third “90.” This study sought to assess the rate and associated factors of viral suppression among people living with HIV (PLWH) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) at the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Clinic in a Ghanaian health facility. Method. The study design was a retrospective analysis of secondary data of 284 HIV registrants on HAART for at least 6 months at the ART Clinic from July 2016 to April 2019. Data on sociodemography including age, gender, marital status, education, and occupation as well as pharmacological (type of medication and duration on medication) and laboratory variable (current viral load results) were extracted from patients’ folders. Viral suppression and failure were determined using the WHO definitions (viral suppression as viral load <1000 copies/ml and virologic failure ≥1000 copies/ml). Regular clinic attendance (used as a proxy measure for medication adherence) was defined as consistent monthly clinic attendance for HAART medication and other clinical management within the past 12 months. Results. Out of the 284 HIV patients, 195 (69%) achieved viral suppression. Of the 195 who were virally suppressed, 77 (39.5%) had undetectable levels, with a similar proportion (39.5%) achieving viral load results ranging from 20 to 200 copies/ml. Moreover, 27 (13.8%) patients had viral load ranging from 201 to 500 copies/ml while 14 (7.2%) recorded viral load from 501 to 1000 copies/ml. No clear pattern in the viral suppression rate was associated with the age groups (). However, regular clinic attendance (used as proxy for medication adherence) () and being on HAART for more than three (3) years () were associated with viral suppression. Conclusion. The rate of viral suppression among PLWH on HAART in the Ho municipality fell short of the WHO target. However, the study identified regular ART clinic attendance and treatment >3 years as factors associated with viral suppression.

AIDS Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision90 days
Acceptance to publication33 days
CiteScore3.200
Impact Factor-
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