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AIDS Research and Treatment
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 731848, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/731848
Research Article

Assessment of Prevalence and Determinants of Occupational Exposure to HIV Infection among Healthcare Workers in Selected Health Institutions in Debre Berhan Town, North Shoa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia, 2014

Department of Nursing, College of Health Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia

Received 30 July 2014; Revised 26 September 2014; Accepted 14 October 2014; Published 13 November 2014

Academic Editor: Inge B. Corless

Copyright © 2014 Filmawit Aynalem Tesfay and Tesfa Dejenie Habtewold. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Health care workers are exposed to different kinds of occupational hazards due to their day to day activities. The most common occupational exposure like body fluids is a potential risk of transmission of blood-borne infection like human immunodeficiency virus. Objective. To assess the prevalence and determinants of occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus infection. Methods and Materials. A descriptive cross-sectional institution based study was conducted in selected four health institutions in Debre Berhan town. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using semistructured interviewer administered questionnaire. The frequency distribution of dependent and independent variables was worked out and presented using frequency table, graph, and chart. Result. The overall prevalence of occupational exposure of the health care workers was found to be 88.6% () in the past 12 months. Contact to potentially infectious body fluids accounts for the largest proportion (56.7%) followed by needle stick injury (31.5%) and glove breakage (28.8%). Conclusion. In this study majority (88.6%) of the health care workers had a risky occupational hazard that exposed them to human immunodeficiency virus infection during the past 12 months. The statistically significant determinant factors were professional status, working room, and time of personal protective equipment usage.