AIDS Research and Treatment / 2015 / Article / Tab 4

Clinical Study

Combination Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV in Rwandan Adults: Clinical Outcomes and Impact on Reproductive Health up to 24 Months

Table 4

Behavioral and clinical changes over time by study group.

Women pre-cARTWomen cARTMen cART
BaselineM12BaselineM12BaselineM12

Living with spouse (%)58.055.046.939.862.670.0
Number of sex partners at the last 6 months (median, range)1 (0–9)1 (0–2)1 (0-1)0 (0-1)1 (0–20)1 (0–3)
Currently sexually active (%)64.056.750.943.666.771.0
Desire to get pregnant (%)11.111.313.28.0NANA
Currently trying to get pregnant (%)9.59.710.85.0NANA
Currently using family planning (%)1,265.549.348.636.8NANA
Frequent vaginal sex in last month (median, range)1,22 (0–7)2 (0–4)1 (0–5)1 (0–6)2 (0–12)3 (0–18)
Used a condom during last sex act (%)40.644.443.141.861.276.5
Frequent washing in vagina last week (median, range)17 (0–28)7 (0–30)7 (0–35)7 (0–21)NANA
Feeling depressed in the last 4 weeks (%)1
 Never/almost never46.555.134.853.756.680.0
 Sometimes28.330.429.526.831.311.4
 Often25.214.535.719.512.18.6
Sexual desire in the last 4 weeks (%)1
 A lot less desire41.137.741.141.524.211.4
 A little less desire24.413.019.69.827.321.4
 The same or increased desire34.549.339.348.748.567.2
Any genital symptoms in the last 6 months (%)1,3,443.227.551.328.434.012.9
Sought STI treatment in the last 6 months (%)125.410.329.815.213.18.6
Any abnormal pelvic exam finding (%)1,553.628.360.939.7NANA
Abnormal bimanual exam (%)7.413.37.919.4NANA
Clinical diagnosis made after pelvic/bimanual exam (%)628.618.627.329.2NANA

Difference between baseline and month 12 shown in bold is statistically significant at .
2Including the family planning methods listed in Table 1. The proportion of women using specific methods over time did not change, but women pre-cART were statistically significantly more likely to use hormonal methods of contraception than women on cART, whereas women on cART were statistically significantly more likely to use condoms.
3For women, these included (all participant-reported, from most frequently reported to less frequently reported) vaginal itching, vaginal burning, unusual vaginal discharge, abdominal pain, discomfort when urinating, rash external genitalia, unusual vaginal odor, vaginal pain, pain during sex, ulcers, abnormal menstrual bleeding, and other. The symptoms indicated with were statistically significantly less prevalent at M12 than baseline in both study groups, in the pre-cART group only, and in the cART group only.
4For men, these included (all participant-reported, from most frequently reported to less frequently reported): genital itching, genital rash, penile pain, genital ulcers, discomfort when urinating, genital burning, pain during sex, and other. The symptoms indicated with were statistically significantly less prevalent at M12 than baseline.
5These included (all clinician-observed) palpable inguinal lymph nodes, lesions on the external, vaginal or cervical epithelia, unusual vaginal discharge, or abundant cervical mucus.
6Including (in decreasing frequency) vaginal discharge syndrome, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, genital warts, genital herpes, and other.

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