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AIDS Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 879052, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/879052
Research Article

Advancing Behavioral HIV Prevention: Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for People Living with HIV and Alcohol Use Disorders

1Comprehensive Alcohol Research Center and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center, Department of Physiology, LSUHSC, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2Yale University School of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, AIDS Program, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
3Yale University School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
4Center for Health, Intervention, & Prevention (CHIP), University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA

Received 17 July 2015; Revised 19 October 2015; Accepted 25 October 2015

Academic Editor: Glenda Gray

Copyright © 2015 M. L. Armstrong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and are associated with increased HIV risk behaviors, suboptimal treatment adherence, and greater risk for disease progression. We used the ADAPT-ITT strategy to adapt an evidence-based intervention (EBI), the Holistic Health Recovery Program (HHRP+), that focuses on secondary HIV prevention and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and apply it to PLWHA with problematic drinking. Focus groups (FGs) were conducted with PLWHA who consume alcohol and with treatment providers at the largest HIV primary care clinic in New Orleans, LA. Overall themes that emerged from the FGs included the following: (1) negative mood states contribute to heavy alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (2) high levels of psychosocial stress, paired with few adaptive coping strategies, perpetuate the use of harmful alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (3) local cultural norms are related to the permissiveness and pervasiveness of drinking and contribute to heavy alcohol use; (4) healthcare providers unanimously stated that outpatient options for AUD intervention are scarce, (5) misperceptions about the relationships between alcohol and HIV are common; (6) PLWHA are interested in learning about alcohol’s impact on ART and HIV disease progression. These data were used to design the adapted EBI.