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AIDS Research and Treatment
Volume 2016, Article ID 2587094, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2587094
Review Article

Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Centre for Drug Discovery Development and Production, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
3School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, University at Buffalo, 701 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA
4Pharmacy Practice (Medicine and Pediatrics), School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, 285 Kapoor Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
5Center for Integrated Global Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA
6Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
7Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Global Health, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 900, Chicago, IL, USA

Received 22 April 2016; Accepted 21 August 2016

Academic Editor: Soraya Seedat

Copyright © 2016 Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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