AIDS Research and Treatment

Psychosocial Correlates among Adolescents of Responses to HIV Prevention Interventions


Publishing date
01 Aug 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
01 Feb 2012

Lead Editor

1Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA

2Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center - College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, USA

3Pediatric Prevention Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA


Psychosocial Correlates among Adolescents of Responses to HIV Prevention Interventions

Description

Considerable progress has been made over the past three decades in the development, determination of efficacy, and implementation of effective behavioral and biomedical interventions designed to reduce the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other STDs among adolescents and young adults and/or to improve the health outcomes of adolescents and children living with HIV/AIDS. As a result, many evidence-based behavioral interventions are being widely disseminated across the globe.

Despite these significant areas of progress, we do know that not all youth respond to interventions which are generally effective. While there is an extensive literature on psychosocial factors associated with risk, less has been written regarding the relationship of psychosocial factors and intervention effect. As the field moves into widespread implementation of effective interventions, these factors assume great epidemiologic importance. Identifying the subset of a population(s) who is at risk of not responding to an intervention and/or identifying potentially remedial factors that predispose youths to not respond could be of great public health importance.

We are interested in manuscripts from behavioral and biomedical studies conducted across the globe that explore these relationships from different perspectives and using different analytic methodologies. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Do certain characteristics individually or in combination predict a greater intervention effect on behavioral change? If so, do these characteristics vary by gender, by age at the time of the intervention, and/or culture?
  • Is a greater immediate effect on behavioral change associated with a more enduring effect over time? What psychosocial and demographic factors influence these relationships?
  • Are there new analytic approaches to understand the dynamic relationship between baseline psychosocial and demographic characteristics and risk experience with intervention effect, biologic development, and/or risk exposure over time?
  • While increased parental monitoring is an important risk reduction factor, what are the psychosocial characteristics of parents and youth which enhance or reduce the effectiveness of parental monitoring? How does the relationship between homogeneity of youth and parent characteristics influence intervention response?
  • Repeated intervention “boosters” over time are associated with modest enhanced intervention impacts overall; what individual characteristics are associated with greater and lesser booster effect?

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/art/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 864683
  • - Editorial

Psychosocial Correlates among Adolescents of Responses to HIV Prevention Interventions

Bonita Stanton | Susan Rosenthal | Xiaoming Li
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 345327
  • - Review Article

Nothing as Practical as a Good Theory? The Theoretical Basis of HIV Prevention Interventions for Young People in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

Kristien Michielsen | Matthew Chersich | ... | Ronan Van Rossem
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 812635
  • - Research Article

Age Differences among Female Sex Workers in the Philippines: Sexual Risk Negotiations and Perceived Manager Advice

Lianne A. Urada | Robert M. Malow | ... | Donald E. Morisky
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 298494
  • - Research Article

Examination of the Relationship between Psychosocial Mediators and Intervention Effects in It’s Your Game: An Effective HIV/STI/Pregnancy Prevention Intervention for Middle School Students

Elizabeth Baumler | Jill Glassman | ... | Heather Franks
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 576149
  • - Research Article

Adolescents Living with HIV: An Indian Profile

Sravya Kurapati | Madhu Vajpayee | ... | Sreenivas Vishnubhatla
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 396163
  • - Research Article

But I Trust My Teen: Parents' Attitudes and Response to a Parental Monitoring Intervention

Aaron Metzger | Christa Ice | Lesley Cottrell
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 231417
  • - Research Article

Exploring Factors Associated with Nonchange in Condom Use Behavior following Participation in an STI/HIV Prevention Intervention for African-American Adolescent Females

Jessica M. Sales | Jennifer L. Brown | ... | Eve Rose
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 659853
  • - Research Article

Decision Processes about Condom Use among Shelter-Homeless LGBT Youth in Manhattan

Geoffrey L. Ream | Kate F. Barnhart | Kevin V. Lotz
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 986978
  • - Research Article

Evaluation of Three Adolescent Sexual Health Programs in Ha Noi and Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam

Van Pham | Hoang Nguyen | ... | Linda M. Kaljee
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 806384
  • - Research Article

When Things Are Not as They Appear: Assessing the Adequacy of Cluster Randomization When Outcome Events Are Rare at Baseline

Veronica Dinaj-Koci | Nanika Brathwaite | ... | Xinguang Chen
AIDS Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate9%
Submission to final decision109 days
Acceptance to publication56 days
CiteScore1.630
Impact Factor-
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