Table of Contents
Advances in Toxicology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 385023, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/385023
Research Article

Influence of Different Doses of Levofloxacin on Antioxidant Defense Systems and Markers of Renal and Hepatic Dysfunctions in Rats

Biochemistry Unit, Department of Chemical Sciences, Ajayi Crowther University, PMB 1066, Oyo, Oyo State 211213, Nigeria

Received 22 September 2014; Revised 9 December 2014; Accepted 9 December 2014

Academic Editor: Arezoo Campbell

Copyright © 2015 Ebenezer Tunde Olayinka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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