Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Urology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1282531, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1282531
Research Article

Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

1Department of Surgery, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
2Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
3Department of Medicine, Philipps University of Marburg, 35039 Marburg, Germany
4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
5TAK Biopharma, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
6Department of Surgical Sciences, Ostrava University, 703 00 Ostrava, Czech Republic
7Department of Urology and Biomedical Laboratory, Clinical Institute, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark

Received 1 June 2016; Accepted 31 July 2016

Academic Editor: Matthew Rutman

Copyright © 2016 Travis K. Mann-Gow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. D. Shah, N. Kohli, S. S. Rajan, and L. Hoyte, “The age distribution, rates, and types of surgery for stress urinary incontinence in the USA,” International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 89–96, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. “FDA public health notification: serious complications associated with transvaginal placement of surgical mesh in repair of pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence,” 2008, http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/PublicHealthNotifications/ucm061976.htm.
  3. US Food and Drug Administration, FDA Public Health Notification: Serious Complications Associated with Transvaginal Placement of Surgical Mesh in Repair of Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence. For Updated Information about Surgical Mesh for Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Update on Serious Complications Associated with Transvaginal Placement of Surgical Mesh for Pelvic Organ Prolapse, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md, USA, 2011, http://www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/safety/alertsandnotices/ucm262435.htm.
  4. C. R. Chapple, S. Raz, L. Brubaker, and P. E. Zimmern, “Mesh sling in an era of uncertainty: lessons learned and the way forward,” European Urology, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 525–529, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. W. S. Reynolds and R. R. Dmochowski, “Urethral bulking: a urology perspective,” Urologic Clinics of North America, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 279–287, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. N. Itano, S. Sweat, and D. Lightner, “The use of bulking agents for stress incontinence,” American Urological Association Update Series, vol. 21, pp. 34–39, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  7. G. Lemperle, P. B. Lappin, C. Stone, and S. M. Lemperle, “Urethral bulking with polymethylmethacrylate microspheres for stress urinary incontinence: tissue persistence and safety studies in miniswine,” Urology, vol. 77, no. 4, pp. 1005.e1–1005.e7, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. S. C. Radley, C. R. Chapple, and J. A. Lee, “Transurethral implantation of silicone polymer for stress incontinence: evaluation of a porcine model and mechanism of action in vivo,” BJU International, vol. 85, no. 6, pp. 646–650, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. T. K. Mann-Gow, J. G. Blaivas, B. J. King et al., “Rat animal model for preclinical testing of microparticle urethral bulking agents,” International Journal of Urology, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 416–420, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. F. Hulbert, F. A. Young, R. S. Mathews, J. J. Klawitter, C. D. Talbert, and F. H. Stelling, “Potential of ceramic materials as permanently implantable skeletal prostheses,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 433–456, 1970. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. A. Hofmann, R. D. Bloebaum, and K. N. Bachus, “Progression of human bone ingrowth into porous-coated implants. Rate of bone growth in humans,” Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 161–166, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. El-Ghannam, A. Hart, D. White, and L. Cunningham, “Mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of a resorbable bioactive implant prepared by rapid prototyping technique,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 101, no. 10, pp. 2851–2861, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. C. Knabe, B. Kraska, C. Koch, U. Gross, H. Zreiqat, and M. Stiller, “A method for immunohistochemical detection of osteogenic markers in undecalcified bone sections,” Biotechnic & Histochemistry, vol. 81, no. 1, pp. 31–39, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. C. Knabe, C. Koch, A. Rack, and M. Stiller, “Effect of β-tricalcium phosphate particles with varying porosity on osteogenesis after sinus floor augmentation in humans,” Biomaterials, vol. 29, no. 14, pp. 2249–2258, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. Stiller, E. Kluk, M. Bohner, M. A. Lopez-Heredia, C. Müller-Mai, and C. Knabe, “Performance of β-tricalcium phosphate granules and putty, bone grafting materials after bilateral sinus floor augmentation in humans,” Biomaterials, vol. 35, no. 10, pp. 3154–3163, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. U. M. Gross and V. Strunz, “Surface staining of sawed sections of undecalcified bone containing alloplastic implants,” Stain Technology, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 217–219, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. A. Imel, T. Malmgren, M. Dadmun, S. Gido, and J. Mays, “In vivo oxidative degradation of polypropylene pelvic mesh,” Biomaterials, vol. 73, pp. 131–141, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. D. R. Ostergard, “Degradation, infection and heat effects on polypropylene mesh for pelvic implantation: what was known and when it was known,” International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 771–774, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. D. R. Henly, D. M. Barrett, T. L. Weiland, M. K. O'Connor, A. A. Malizia, and A. J. Wein, “Particulate silicone for use in periurethral injections: local tissue effects and search for migration,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 153, no. 6, pp. 2039–2043, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. C.-C. Tsai, V. Lin, and L. Tang, “Injectable biomaterials for incontinence and vesico-ureteral reflux: current status and future promise,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, vol. 77, no. 1, pp. 171–178, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. Berg, “Polytef augmentation urethroplasty: correlation of surgically incurable urinary incontinence by injection technique,” Archives of Surgery, vol. 107, no. 3, pp. 379–381, 1973. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. W. Boykin, F. R. Rodriguez, J. P. Brizzolara, I. M. Thompson, and E. J. Zeidman, “Complete urinary obstruction following periurethral polytetrafluoroethylene injection for urinary incontinence,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 141, no. 5, pp. 1199–1200, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. A. Malizia Jr., H. M. Reiman, R. P. Myers et al., “Migration and granulomatous reaction after periurethral injection of polytef (Teflon),” The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 251, no. 24, pp. 3277–3281, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. T. C. Laurent, U. B. G. Laurent, and J. R. E. Fraser, “The structure and function of hyaluronan: an overview,” Immunology and Cell Biology, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. A1–A7, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. Pannek, F. H. Brands, and T. Senge, “Particle migration after transurethral injection of carbon coated beads for stress urinary incontinence,” Journal of Urology, vol. 166, no. 4, pp. 1350–1353, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. “Silicon levels in human tissues,” in Biochemistry of Silicon and Related Problems, J. H. Austin, Ed., pp. 255–268, Springer, 1978.
  27. P. E. Lee, R. C. Kung, and H. P. Drutz, “Periurethral autologous fat injection as treatment for female stress urinary incontinence: a randomized double-blind controlled trial,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 165, no. 1, pp. 153–158, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus