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Advances in Virology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 186512, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/186512
Review Article

Oncolytic Virotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, ARB R4-202, P.O. Box 100278, Gainesville, FL 32610-0278, USA
2Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, ARB R4-295, P.O. Box 100266, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

Received 6 July 2011; Accepted 31 August 2011

Academic Editor: Nanhai G. Chen

Copyright © 2012 Swarna Bais et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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