Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Advances in Virology
Volume 2019, Article ID 6464521, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/6464521
Research Article

Epstein-Barr Virus- (EBV-) Immortalized Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines (LCLs) Express High Level of CD23 but Low CD27 to Support Their Growth

1Department of Medical Sciences, School of Healthcare and Medical Sciences, Sunway University, Jalan Universiti, Bandar Sunway, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
2Department of Biological Sciences, School of Science and Technology, Sunway University, Jalan Universiti, Bandar Sunway, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
3Sunway Medical Centre, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia

Correspondence should be addressed to Sin-Yeang Teow; ym.ude.yawnus@tdlanor

Received 30 November 2018; Revised 20 February 2019; Accepted 6 March 2019; Published 28 March 2019

Academic Editor: Finn S. Pedersen

Copyright © 2019 Hooi-Yeen Yap et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. B. A. Stanfield and M. A. Luftig, “Recent advances in understanding Epstein-Barr virus,” F1000Research, vol. 6, article no. 386, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. L. M. Hutt-Fletcher, “The long and complicated relationship between Epstein-Barr virus and epithelial cells,” Journal of Virology, vol. 91, no. 1, Article ID e01677-16, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. Y.-H. Ko, “EBV and human cancer,” Experimental and Molecular Medicine, vol. 47, no. 1, p. e130, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  4. N. Omi, Y. Tokuda, Y. Ikeda et al., “Efficient and reliable establishment of lymphoblastoid cell lines by Epstein-Barr virus transformation from a limited amount of peripheral blood,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 43833, 2017. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. T. Hussain and R. Mulherkar, “Lymphoblastoid cell lines: a continuous in vitro source of cells to study carcinogen sensitivity and DNA repair,” International Journal of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 75–87, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  6. A. Draube and M. Von Bergwelt-Baildon, “Immortalized B cells: a neverending source of antigenpresenting cells for vaccines?” Expert Review of Vaccines, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 411–415, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. S. Sadreddini, F. Jadidi-Niaragh, V. Younesi et al., “Evaluation of EBV transformation of human memory B-cells isolated by FACS and MACS techniques,” Journal of Immunotoxicology, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 490–497, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. H. Yap, S. Tee, M. Wong, S. Chow, S. Peh, and S. Teow, “Pathogenic role of immune cells in rheumatoid arthritis: implications in clinical treatment and biomarker development,” Cells, vol. 7, no. 10, p. 161, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. B. Marston, A. Palanichamy, and J. H. Anolik, “B cells in the pathogenesis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis,” Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 307–315, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. De Miguel, B. Galocha, J. A. Jover et al., “Mechanisms of CD23 hyperexpression on B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis,” The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 1222–1228, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. X. Zhang, E. Burch, L. Cai et al., “CD40 mediates downregulation of CD32B on specific memory B cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis,” The Journal of Immunology, vol. 190, no. 12, pp. 6015–6022, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. F. Hu, W. Zhang, L. Shi et al., “Impaired CD27+IgD+ B cells with altered gene signature in rheumatoid arthritis,” Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 9, p. 626, 2018. View at Google Scholar
  13. J. Anderson, L. Caplan, J. Yazdany et al., “Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American college of rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice,” Arthritis Care and Research, vol. 64, no. 5, pp. 640–647, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  14. J. Hui-Yuen, S. McAllister, S. Koganti, E. Hill, and S. Bhaduri-Mcintosh, “Establishment of Epstein-Barr virus growth-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines,” Journal of Visualized Experiments, no. 57, Article ID e3321, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. V. Roth, Doubling Time Calculator, 2006, http://www.doubling-time.com/compute.php.
  16. F. Wang, C. D. Gregory, M. Rowe et al., “Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23,” Proceedings of the National Acadamy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 84, no. 10, pp. 3452–3456, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. K. Agematsu, S. Hokibara, H. Nagumo, and A. Komiyama, “CD27: a memory B-cell marker,” Immunology Today, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 204–206, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  18. J. Rambert, M. Mamani-Matsuda, D. Moynet et al., “Molecular blocking of CD23 supports its role in the pathogenesis of arthritis,” PLoS ONE, vol. 4, no. 3, p. e4834, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. T. Azim, M. J. Allday, and D. H. Crawford, “Immortalization of Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD23-negative B lymphocytes by the addition of B cell growth factor,” Journal of General Virology, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 665–671, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. C. Megyola, J. Ye, and S. Bhaduri-Mcintosh, “Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with Epstein-Barr virus,” Virology Journal, vol. 8, no. 84, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus