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Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 539082, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/539082
Research Article

Methylated Trivalent Arsenic-Glutathione Complexes are More Stable than their Arsenite Analog

Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 22 February 2008; Accepted 3 April 2008

Academic Editor: Vito Lippolis

Copyright © 2008 Andrew J. Percy and Jürgen Gailer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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