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Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 717421, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/717421
Research Article

Antioxidant Enzyme Inhibitor Role of Phosphine Metal Complexes in Lung and Leukemia Cell Lines

1Department of Chemistry, Science, and Letters Faculty, Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, Fakıuşağı, 80000 Osmaniye, Turkey
2Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Bayburt, 69000 Bayburt, Turkey
3Science Institute, Kanuni University, 01170 Adana, Turkey

Received 2 May 2014; Accepted 1 December 2014; Published 28 December 2014

Academic Editor: Claudio Pettinari

Copyright © 2014 Burcu Saygıdeğer Demir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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