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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 16806, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/16806
Research Article

Hypothesis: A Role for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Mediating and Relieving MicroRNA-Guided Translational Repression?

1Centre de Recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre de Recherche du CHUL (CHUQ), 2705 Boulevard, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Laurier, Canada G1V 4G2
2Department of Anatomy and physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Québec, Canada G1K 7P4

Received 8 April 2006; Accepted 2 May 2006

Copyright © 2006 Isabelle Plante and Patrick Provost. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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