BioMed Research International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision67 days
Acceptance to publication30 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor2.276

A 2D Photographic and 3D Digital Dental Model Analysis of Golden Percentage in Maxillary Anterior Teeth

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BioMed Research International publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies covering a wide range of subjects within the biomedical sciences. The journal will accept both basic and translational research.

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BioMed Research International maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Review Article

Application of Multiparametric Intraoperative Ultrasound in Glioma Surgery

Gliomas are the most invasive and fatal primary malignancy of the central nervous system that have poor prognosis, with maximal safe resection representing the gold standard for surgical treatment. To achieve gross total resection (GTR), neurosurgery relies heavily on generating continuous, real-time, intraoperative glioma descriptions based on image guidance. Given the limitations of currently available equipment, developing a real-time image-guided resection technique that provides reliable functional and anatomical information during intraoperative settings is imperative. Nowadays, the application of intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) has been shown to improve resection rates and maximize brain function preservation. IOUS, which presents an attractive option due to its low cost, minimal operational flow interruptions, and lack of radiation exposure, is able to provide real-time localization and accurate tumor size and shape descriptions while helping distinguish residual tumors and addressing brain shift. Moreover, the application of new advancements in ultrasound technology, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, three-dimensional ultrasound, navigable ultrasound, ultrasound elastography, and functional ultrasound, could help to achieve GTR during glioma surgery. The current review describes current advancements in ultrasound technology and evaluates the role and limitation of IOUS in glioma surgery.

Research Article

Association between Periodontal Disease and Comorbidities in Saudi’s Eastern Province

The incidence of periodontal diseases is associated with multiple comorbidities that influence a patient’s treatment planning. This study evaluates the relation between periodontal disease and multiple comorbidities reported in the Saudi population from the Eastern province. This study was conducted on 190 patients, who visited the periodontology clinics at Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. Demographic data, smoking habits, past medical and dental histories, blood pressure, random blood glucose, and recent haemoglobin A1c were recorded. A comprehensive periodontal examination included the number of missing teeth, pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and mobility of all teeth except third molars. Radiographic bone loss was measured on standardized full-mouth periapical radiographs. Multivariable regression models were calculated aiming to see the association between different comorbidities and alveolar bone loss with confounders controlled. Out of 190 periodontitis patients, 56 (29.5%) were males and 134 (70.5%) were females. More than half of the patients (60%) were between 26 and 50 years, 30% of them had diabetes, and 18% were smokers. The risk of alveolar bone loss was higher in persons who had diabetes and those who had both diabetes and coronary heart disease than those who did not, although the association was not statistically significant (, , 2.82, and , , 6.96, respectively). The risk of alveolar bone loss was significantly higher among persons with diabetes and hypertension ( and , 4.75). Collectively, the risk of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis patients increases with diabetes in the presence of other comorbidities regardless of smoking or gender.

Research Article

Pretreatment with Pectoral Nerve Block II Is Effective for Reducing Pain in Patients Undergoing Thoracoscopic Lobectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Background. Although video-assisted thoracoscopy has a smaller incision than traditional surgery, the postoperative pain is still severe. Ultrasound-guided pectoral nerve block (PECS) II is a new technique that can reduce pain in patients, and it had not been reported in the analgesia after thoracoscopic lobectomy. Methods. 40 patients scheduled for thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the PECS II group received 0.5% ropivacaine 25 ml before the general anesthesia, while patients in the placebo group received 0.9% saline. Thirty minutes after the block was performed, a pin-prick test was used to analyze the sense of pain of T2-T6 segments. The primary endpoint was the total consumption of fentanyl. Data were collected in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and in the ward within 24 hours after operation. Results. The total consumption of fentanyl and the consumption of fentanyl in the intravenous analgesia pump within 24 hours after the operation were significantly lower in the PECS II group compared to the placebo group (). The implementation rate of rescue analgesia during operation and in PACU in the PECS II group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (). The numerical rating scale (NRS) in 1 and 4 h after operation was lower in the PECS II group (). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) of the PECS II group at chest entering (T1) were significantly lower than those in the placebo group (). Conclusion. Preconditioning of PECS II can stabilize the intraoperative circulation and significantly reduce pain and the consumption of opioids after operation.

Research Article

The Moderating Role of Ethical Leadership on Nurses’ Green Behavior Intentions and Real Green Behavior

Aim. This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between green behavior intentions and green behavior and analyzing the moderating role of ethical leadership in this relationship. Background. Nurses’ green behavior can directly reduce costs and protect the natural environment and organizational sustainability by saving resources and energy. It is not clear how green behavior intention affects green behavior or how the positive influence of green behavior intention on green behavior can be enhanced. Design and Methods. This is a cross-sectional study, and the surveys are collected from 3 hospitals in China. Of the initial cohort of 489 nurses, 89.6% were female. There were 327 subjects (66.9%) aged 35 or less, 267 subjects (54.6%) with 10 years or less of work experience, and 220 unmarried subjects (44.9%). Data were collected from January to July 2018, using three surveys: green behavior intentions, green behavior, and ethical leadership. Results. Green behavior intentions impacted employee green behavior (, , ). The interaction term for green behavior intentions and ethical leadership was significant (, , ); the conditional direct effect of green behavior intentions was only significant at a high level of ethical leadership (, , , , 95% confidence interval of 0.22-0.84). Conclusion. The intention to engage in green behavior influences nurses’ green behavior positively, and the relationship is stronger when ethical leadership is high in the organization than when ethical leadership is low. The results of this study can help both academics and practitioners to understand the micromechanism of environmentally sustainable development in more detail and to identify the mechanisms and boundary conditions of green behavioral intentions, green behavior, and ethical leadership.

Research Article

Iron Status in Newly Diagnosed β-Thalassemia Major: High Rate of Iron Status due to Erythropoiesis Drive

Background. Iron overload in severe β-thalassemia is a serious complication that occurs during the course of the disease. Information about the iron status during initial illness with β-thalassemia major seemed to be limited. This study is aimed at analyzing iron status, serum hepcidin, and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) levels in newly diagnosed β-thalassemia major. Methods. A case-control study was performed at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, which included 41 children with newly diagnosed β-thalassemia major. Age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled. The subjects had no blood transfusion, had normal liver function, and had no sign of inflammation. The groups were compared in terms of the levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TS), serum hepcidin, and GDF15 as iron homeostasis parameters. Results. Of the 41 newly diagnosed β-thalassemia major patients, those who were less than 24 months old had significantly lower median Hb levels than controls (5.0 vs. 11.7 g/dL, ). The median SF and TS levels were significantly higher than those in controls (315.0 vs. 29.0 ng/mL, ; 70.6 vs. 16.5%, ), and median hepcidin was at the normal limit, but the value was higher in patients (251.0 vs. 123.1 ng/mL, ). The median GDF15 level was significantly higher in patients (2,095.3 vs. 342.4 pg/mL, ). There was a positive correlation between SF-TS, SF-hepcidin, TS-hepcidin, SF-GDF15, TS-GDF15, and hepcidin-GDF15 (). Conclusion. In newly diagnosed β-thalassemia major, an increase in iron status occurred. This may be caused by increased iron absorption due to massive erythropoietic activity, characterized by an increase in GDF15 levels, which does not cause hepcidin suppression. The iron homeostasis response seems to be physiologically indicated by a tendency to increase hepcidin levels.

Research Article

TREM1 Blockade Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Intestinal Dysfunction through Inhibiting Intestinal Apoptosis and Inflammation Response

Objective. The lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute intestinal dysfunction model has been widely applied in recent years. Here, our aim was to investigate the effect of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM1) inhibitor in LPS-induced acute intestinal dysfunction. Methods. Male rats were randomly assigned into normal (saline injection), model (LPS and saline injection), and LP17 (LPS and LP17 (a synthetic TREM1 inhibitor) injection) groups. The levels of intestinal TREM1 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Intestinal permeability and apoptosis were separately assessed by the lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio and TUNEL assay. The levels of soluble TREM1 (sTREM1), TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were measured in the plasma and intestinal tissues by ELISA. The expression levels of NF-κB, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) were measured with RT-qPCR and western blot. After transfection with si-TREM1 in LPS-induced intestinal epithelium-6 (IEC-6) cells, p-p65 and p-IκBα levels were detected by western blot. Results. LP17-mediated TREM1 inhibition alleviated the intestine tissue damage in rats with LPS-induced acute intestinal dysfunction. LP17 attenuated the LPS-induced increase in sTREM1, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in the plasma and intestinal tissues. Furthermore, intestine permeability and epithelial cell apoptosis were ameliorated by LP17. LP17 attenuated the LPS-induced increase in the expression of TREM1, HMGB1, TLR-4, and NF-κB in the intestine tissues. In vitro, TREM1 knockdown inactivated the NF-κB signaling in LPS-induced IEC-6 cells. Conclusion. LP17 could ameliorate LPS-induced acute intestinal dysfunction, which was associated with inhibition of intestinal apoptosis and inflammation response.

BioMed Research International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision67 days
Acceptance to publication30 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor2.276
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