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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 45716, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/45716
Review Article

Generation of RNAi Libraries for High-Throughput Screens

Department of Chemistry and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA, USA

Received 12 February 2006; Accepted 3 April 2006

Copyright © 2006 Julie Clark and Sheng Ding. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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