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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 71659, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/71659
Review Article

Delivery Systems for the Direct Application of siRNAs to Induce RNA Interference (RNAi) In Vivo

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Philipps-University Marburg, Karl-v.-Frisch-Strasse 1, Marburg 35033, Germany

Received 14 January 2006; Accepted 27 February 2006

Copyright © 2006 Achim Aigner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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