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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 87340, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/87340
Review Article

RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing in Hematopoietic Cells

Department of Hematology, Hemostasis, and Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover 30625, Germany

Received 8 February 2006; Accepted 3 April 2006

Copyright © 2006 Letizia Venturini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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