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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2007, Article ID 13684, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/13684
Research Article

Investigation of Microencapsulated BSH Active Lactobacillus in the Simulated Human GI Tract

1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, PQ, Canada H3A 2B4
2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, PQ, Canada H3G 1Y6
3Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada H3G 1Y6

Received 15 May 2007; Accepted 7 October 2007

Academic Editor: Allal Ouhtit

Copyright © 2007 Christopher Martoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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